Seattle culture – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 23:46:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://seattlewto.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Seattle culture – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ 32 32 Unexpected Growth To See For 3D Cell Culture Market By 2027 With Detailed Competition Analysis | Becton, Dickinson et al., Thermo Fisher Scientific https://seattlewto.org/unexpected-growth-to-see-for-3d-cell-culture-market-by-2027-with-detailed-competition-analysis-becton-dickinson-et-al-thermo-fisher-scientific/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 13:35:09 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/unexpected-growth-to-see-for-3d-cell-culture-market-by-2027-with-detailed-competition-analysis-becton-dickinson-et-al-thermo-fisher-scientific/ Market Snapshot 3D cell culture is a human-made culture environment that allows biological cells to interact with their environment under all three conditions. Cells grown in 3D cell culture exhibit similar properties to cells found in living organisms in terms of cellular characteristics and behavior. This technique allows cells to grow in their natural environment […]]]>

Market Snapshot

3D cell culture is a human-made culture environment that allows biological cells to interact with their environment under all three conditions. Cells grown in 3D cell culture exhibit similar properties to cells found in living organisms in terms of cellular characteristics and behavior. This technique allows cells to grow in their natural environment under in vivo conditions.

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The global 3D cell culture market is estimated to be worth US $ 2,604.3 million in 2020 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 23.4% during the forecast period (2020-2027).

Market factors

The increase in product launches by key companies is expected to drive the growth of the global 3D cell culture market during the forecast period.

Key companies are focused on launching 3D cell culture products, which are expected to drive the growth of the global 3D cell culture market during the forecast period. For example, in January 2021, Jellagen Limited, a biotechnology company manufacturing high-value type 0 collagen derived from jellyfish, announced the launch of JellaGel Hydrogel. Three-dimensional hydrogels allow cells to develop and interact with their entire environment. Cells grown in a 3D model were found to be more natural, with improved cell viability, morphology, proliferation and differentiation.

The increasing R&D activities in 3D cell culture are expected to propel the 3D Cell Culture Market growth during the forecast period. For example, in August 2020, researchers at Okayama University created a new 3D cell culture model of pancreatic cancer that closely mimics the “fibrotic” tissue seen in patients.

COVID-19 impact assessment

The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) and lockdowns in various countries around the world have had an impact on the financial situation of businesses in all industries. Private health is one of the sectors most affected by the pandemic. Lockdowns in various countries have created an economic burden on the private health sector. Healthcare providers face challenges with manpower, equipment, consumables and other resources to ensure the safety of patients with other illnesses and the decline in outpatient visits, among others. In addition, the pandemic has had a negative impact on the development, production and supply of medicines, and has affected the growth of the healthcare segment of various companies across the world. This has led to the closure of industrial establishments, with the exception of the manufacturing of commodities, and a disruption of the product supply chain. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the economy in three main ways; 1) directly affecting production and demand; 2) by creating ruptures in distribution channels; and 3) through its financial impact on businesses and financial markets. The supply chain and manufacturing activities in India, China, the United States and others have been disrupted due to global lockdowns. While countries like Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore and others are facing problems with transporting drugs and medicines. Thus, the pandemic is expected to slightly disrupt the R&D activities of the 3D cell culture market. However, currently, the spread of coronavirus has driven the growth of the 3D cell culture market, due to the increase of 3D cell culture for regeneration of 3D cell culture organs to understand the mechanism of infection by the coronavirus.

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Market constraints

Lack of consistency in 3D cell culture products is expected to hamper the growth of the global 3D cell culture market during the forecast period.

Competition section

The major players operating in the global 3D cell culture market are Becton, Dickinson and Company, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Lonza, Merck KGaA, 3D Biotek LLC, 3D Biomatrix, Inc., 3D Biomatrix, Inc. and REPROCELL Inc.

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Contents

Global 3D Cell Culture Market Research Report

Section 1: Global 3D Cell Culture Industry Overview
Section 2: Global Economic Impact on 3D Cell Culture Industry
Section 3: Competition in the world market by industry producers
Section 4: World Productions, Revenue (Value), by Region
Section 5: Global Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import, Geographically
Section 6: World Productions, Revenue (Value), Price Trend, Product Type
Section 7: Global Market Analysis, Based on Application
Section 8: 3D Cell Culture Market Price Analysis
Section 9: Market Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers
Section 10: Key Distributor / Supplier / Dealer Strategies and Policies
Section 11: Analysis of Key Marketing Strategy, by Market Suppliers
Section 12: Analysis of Market Effect Factors
Section 13: Global 3D Cell Culture Market Forecast

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New book explores Bum ski culture https://seattlewto.org/new-book-explores-bum-ski-culture/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 18:10:59 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/new-book-explores-bum-ski-culture/ Decades later she has dedicated her life to seasonal jobs in mountain towns and even after writing an entire book on the subject, Heather Hansman can’t quite put her finger on the main appeal of being a ski freak. “Why does something so intangible become something we are obsessed with?” »In his new book Powder […]]]>

Decades later she has dedicated her life to seasonal jobs in mountain towns and even after writing an entire book on the subject, Heather Hansman can’t quite put her finger on the main appeal of being a ski freak. “Why does something so intangible become something we are obsessed with?” »In his new book Powder days: ski enthusiasts, ski towns and the future of snow hunting, the Seattle-based writer ruminates on the fibers that weave together a lifetime of pursuit of “snow, freedom and savagery”.

Hansman traveled to Beaver Creek, near Vail, from her childhood in Massachusetts, working in customer services at an elite resort just so she could ski for free every day. In Powder days, it traces how the rugged and rebellious old guard of seaside resorts like Jackson Hole or Aspen defined levels of freshness, literally crossing borders in search of perfect lines. For seasoned skiers, nothing can match the adrenaline rush of a turn in powder snow.

But as much as she recognizes the “indulgent and immature, selfishly exclusive” aspects of ski bum culture, she has also discovered how ski towns are shaped by economic and racial disparities, and how a stew of addiction, uprooting and dying. exposure to death can affect mental health. “Ski resorts are obviously not reality, but they are also like compressed slices of reality,” she says. The social housing shortage may have felt like a quirk of the remote mountainous enclave when it was highlighted in, say, the cult classic of 1993. extreme aspen, but today all of America can understand what happens when every apartment in the city is converted to vacation rentals and low-paid workers have nowhere to live.

Of all of Hansman’s idiosyncratic ski resort profiles in Powder days– the streetcar line to Jackson Hole, the treacherous North Ridge of Bridger Bowl – none are in the Pacific Northwest, where she has lived for the past eight years (although Crystal is mentioned). Considering our lack of real ski towns, there are fewer ski enthusiasts throwing pizza or four people living in a room in a
inn at the foot of the slopes; Still, there are plenty of obsessives sleeping in Washington state parking lots. “There is such a part of American narrative fantasy in all of this, about ‘Go west, where the mountains are bigger,’ she says. “You have exactly that in the Cascades. Skiing has changed in the days of remote office work, but chasing powder still isn’t easy. According to Hansman, “It’s about living the dream, but it’s not always a dream. “


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Mississippi-rooted podcast mixes religion and pop culture https://seattlewto.org/mississippi-rooted-podcast-mixes-religion-and-pop-culture/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 05:06:51 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/mississippi-rooted-podcast-mixes-religion-and-pop-culture/ TUPELO, Mississippi (AP) – Angie Rains Farris and her husband, Tim Farris, live in Hendersonville, Tennessee, north of Nashville. They were in love with high school in 1980, when Angie graduated from Tupelo High School. In the pre-digital era, podcasts weren’t even a thing. Today, Angie and her younger brother, Frank Rains, Jr., host a […]]]>

TUPELO, Mississippi (AP) – Angie Rains Farris and her husband, Tim Farris, live in Hendersonville, Tennessee, north of Nashville. They were in love with high school in 1980, when Angie graduated from Tupelo High School.

In the pre-digital era, podcasts weren’t even a thing. Today, Angie and her younger brother, Frank Rains, Jr., host a weekly podcast, “History Through The Eyes of Faith,” which recently completed its 30th episode.

With titles like “Bill Shatner and Batman” and “Nazareth on the DL”, the podcasts are aimed at an audience who may not have pieced together the pieces of history through the “eyes of faith” . Farris said she and Rains, who also lives in the Nashville area, make a great on-air duo.

“I asked Frank if he would be the host because he’s funny,” she said. “He’s got great delivery and he’s entertaining. He’s a comedian, really. His son, Wes, runs the machinery and produces the show.


Rains said his sister does the “heavy lifting” on the air, while he tries to keep things fun and relevant.

“It’s really important not to have a hangover,” he said with a laugh. “Angie does all the prep work. I just put on headphones and try to come up with something silly to talk about at the start. I make a lot of references to Star Wars and Game of Thrones, because I know more about those things than the Bible.

Farris, on the other hand, is an attentive student, both of the Bible and of the culture she says the Bible helped create.

“A lot of people say we are a ‘Christian nation’,” she said. “But we don’t even know what that means. The church has been written about history, but what people don’t understand is that the church has been making history for hundreds of years. Western history was written by the church!

Farris said learning to see history this way can help prevent mistakes, or at least help avoid repeating them.

“A lot of what we’re going through now is because we don’t understand the story,” she said. “If we knew the story, we could look at the patterns and learn not to take the wrong approach. We could see what leads to the light and what leads us down a dark path. “

She might struggle with the technical side of podcasting, but Farris is on a solid footing when it comes to mastering content. With an undergraduate degree in philosophy from Southern Miss, an MA in Christian Education from Scarritt Graduate School in Nashville, and decades of experience teaching denominational history to religious groups, Farris is an inspiring teacher. confidence.

“You have to think about it,” she said. “Don’t tell me you’ve come to a conclusion if you don’t know the story.” I’m telling the story from a certain point of view, of course. But you can decide for yourself what you believe.

Farris always “brings her wit” to the podcast, and sometimes she brings her husband’s wit as well. Farris said she invited her husband, Tim, who holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in electrical engineering from Ole Miss, and a doctorate in physics from Vanderbilt, to talk about science.

“I love scientific conversations,” she said. “We are not afraid to take the plunge; I try not to leave anything out. I want to include all of these elements that help us understand what faith is and how it informs our view of history. I believe it all goes together.

As the podcast approaches the story from a Christian perspective, Farris said she hopes it will reach a wider audience.

“We try to play down the idea that it’s fair to Christians,” she said. “More than half of our listeners are under 30 and some of them have never heard this story. I hope that now or later people who have never heard the gospel will hear it.

Thirty episodes in the podcast, Farris said she was just coming to the “good things.”

“We are just now coming to the center of faith,” she said. “I’m just curious to see where this is going. I have to remember that God is good at taking stock. I just need to tell the story.


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Hannah Moscovitch’s great victory | Arts + Culture | Halifax, Nova Scotia https://seattlewto.org/hannah-moscovitchs-great-victory-arts-culture-halifax-nova-scotia/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 21:35:19 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/hannah-moscovitchs-great-victory-arts-culture-halifax-nova-scotia/ Tn day Hannah Moscovitch wins the Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama, Halifax’s most decorated playwright sips a café au lait, unties and knots her messy bun as a soft light shines around her. It’s a serene Wednesday afternoon in his house in the north, with no champagne in sight. “I feel like I have […]]]>

Tn day Hannah Moscovitch wins the Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama, Halifax’s most decorated playwright sips a café au lait, unties and knots her messy bun as a soft light shines around her. It’s a serene Wednesday afternoon in his house in the north, with no champagne in sight.

“I feel like I have paid in pain with this one. I feel like I’m fucking paid for this piece, ”says Moscovitch of Middle Class Sexual Misconduct, his 16th screenplay, now recognized by one of the most awarded cultural prizes in the country.

Recently published in book form, the story centers on a 19-year-old college student and her 40-year-old teacher, while erasing readers’ expectations and notions of power. The piece, based on composites of his own personal experiences and the stories of his friends, is a Moscovitch classic: heavy and messy; addictive and validating; send postcards from the gray swamp where sex and power intersect.

When asked what she’s most proud of in the room, she runs into another room, grabs a thin copy, and cracks her spine as the sticker announcing her award flashes on the cover. “I’m proud of it,” she said, showing dedication. It reads: “To future women. ”

Here we chat with the Drama Desk nominated playwright and Nova Scotia Masterworks winner about her bombshell, her post- # MeToo play, what it feels like to be one of the most exciting names in the world. Canadian drama today and more.

The Coast: How do you deal with the difficulty of writing these heavy topics? Since most of your plays delve into the atrocities of war or gender-based violence, how do you ignore that when you close your laptop or put your pen down at the end of the day?

Hannah Moscovitch: It’s embarrassing, to some extent, how ready I am to step into dark material – and it makes sense. I do not know. I have times when it’s too much or I feel like I’m traumatized, that’s for sure. I had these moments on particular projects. But generally, because who I write about, it is about their lived experiences that I write. And their lived experience is far worse than anything I have experienced writing about it. But it gives me a constant source of perspective.

And also I grew up in a synagogue where there were a lot of Holocaust survivors. So I grew up in the shadow of the genocide. So that gives you a special perspective. It gives you an idea of ​​how you see the world and what is normal for you.

I think because of my childhood: I think because of that I just have a built-in ability for darker subjects, honestly.

So most of your work is real stories about real people?

I really made it sound like that with what I just said. I mean, rarely, although I really like research, or I do a lot of heavy research projects.

I only wrote fiction. And yet, you know… one of the plays I wrote was about the children of Nazis who grew up in Paraguay after WWII. It only takes a huge amount of research to access the writing in a respectful, specific, and authentic way. And so, again, you’re like in the endless reading pool about the children of the Nazis and the Holocaust and the aftermath of WWII. It’s still fiction, just with a strong research component to it.

So in terms of balancing all the heavy stuff, do you almost feel like you’re swimming in that big pool and then you grab a little cup of water and walk out of the pool with that? And so everyone is like, “This mug looks really heavy.” And you say to yourself: I was just a little in this—

– All that swimming pool, over there, behind me! Welcome to a drink of it! It’s a beautiful metaphor, exactly. And I have the impression that this pool contains people to whom I owe something.

Like they live there and let you swim.

Yes, and the current project I’m working on is about the ’60s scoop on Indigenous children, with a co-creator named Jennifer Podolski. And it’s a TV show, a limited series for Crave. And again, you might be writing it down, but if behind you in that pool is every Scoop survivor from the ’60s, then your trauma is limited in writing about it by the depth of theirs.

As in real life, it often feels like your pieces are ending but not resolved – they have an end point, they just aren’t ordered. Why is it important for you not to arch things?

Sometimes it’s mean to do that, you know? Because what you basically do is whether the audience like it or not, you subcontract the meaning to them: the ending, which would give you the moral message, just give you a morale boost. I’ll just show it to you and let you decide what to think about it.

I was like, ‘Oh, my God, the audience is going to kill me for this. Like, they’re gonna be mad at me for writing it that way. But that’s not what happened.

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Sometimes people don’t like it in my writing. I’m in trouble for this. People get mad because I didn’t give them a specific way of looking at the material. I think it’s just a question of aesthetics. I think for me, I prefer to leave it in the hands of the public.

I think, sometimes maybe wrongly, that I digress from that and say, “I’ll leave you, the audience.” You are intelligent. You can know what to think and feel about it.

One thing I love about your job is that your dialogue is so real it feels like a punch. When I saw the production of your first three works by Matchstick Theater this fall, FOOTNOTES, the dialogue was so real it destroyed me. How do you deal with this?

I think, for some reason, part of the art that I love to do about writing drama is authentic dialogue. And I always liked it. And I think maybe it’s a couple of things in my life: like being a bit of a stranger, being a stranger when I was a kid, then working in a bar for five years and hearing constantly. dialogues at formative moments of my life. – like always being out of the conversation and listening to it.

I get to this part more easily. And then there are other parts of the writing that are much more difficult for me, like the structure. All this, that is to say that the plays are dialogues, they are always this medium which is located in the zone of the similars, the interpersonal relations between people. And therefore, ease of dialogue of all kinds will help you.

I think because I spent all this time working in a bar for five years, hearing how men talk, I acquired the ability to write like this: listen and hear how men spoke when women were not at the table. And it was just when I was writing [my first play] Trial, I worked in this restaurant. So I was like, just in touch with it.

What inspired Middle Class Sexual Misconduct?

I think in this case it’s fair to say that while the play is not autobiographical, I have had personal experiences that align with some of what happened in the play. It’ll seem old-fashioned now to say that, but then [around 2017, when it debuted]I was very aware that romances between students and teachers were often framed by a male point of view. And that was back when everything was happening with #MeToo: Steven Galloway was happening. So I was interested in what I could write about it that would turn that old student-teacher romance and write it for a post- # MeToo world, with the information I had as a grown woman thinking back to my experiences being a child: what happened when I was a child, in my teenage years.

I don’t think it’s dated, because I think for a lot of us during #MeToo we’re still trying to figure out what that means for the future.

There was a reading of Middle Class Sexual Misconduct in Seattle in 2017, in June, as three months before the publication of Harvey Weinstein’s allegations. And there was about 150 people in the audience, and I’ve been setting there before, with my heart pounding a little bit, like, “They’re going to hate her.” They will hate me.

Because what the play does is take you through a student-teacher romance from a male perspective, and then it takes it to a female romance at a key moment in the end. And then you suddenly have to look back through his perspective on what happened. So you only hear the male teacher talking about what’s going on until I change it at the very end, and you hear from her. So you only really saw him through his eyes until the end.

I was like, ‘Oh, my God, the audience is going to kill me for this. Like, they’re gonna be mad at me for writing it that way. But that’s not what happened.

I was completely off what I thought, which side the audience was going to be on. I expected this to really fuck the audience. And they were like, with her, and it seemed like a real change. But I still look back and think, “Wow, like the level I was afraid of how much they would hate her for reporting it.”

It’s about that time when women didn’t think they would be believed and were unable to come forward.

Why is the intersection of sex and power, or gender and power, such a fertile inspiration for you?

I feel like I always end up talking about my childhood. But my mom is a feminist non-fiction writer. So I grew up thinking about these questions all the time at a time when feminism was pejorative. So I think that’s always been the lens that I look through, whether I like it or not, because I was given that lens.

And I mean, that’s what being a feminist is, isn’t it? It’s not always fun. Often this is not the case.

You can’t just float, can you? Just float in your culture. You always look at your culture and see what it does for you and for other people like you. And the others in general. So I think so, it’s like my mom is a heroine. And she gave me that goal, for better or for worse.

You are also at a point in your career where you are inspiring other playwrights: people see you as a light in this male dominated industry. What would you like to be able to say to these young directors?

Don’t just include women. Push yourself to the limit of inclusion. But if I had to talk to the younger version of me, it would be: the stories you tell are relevant. They are important. Women want to hear them. Some of the most significant experiences in my life in theater and in my art have been written specifically for and for women.



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Turnstile announces 2022 North American tour https://seattlewto.org/turnstile-announces-2022-north-american-tour/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 17:33:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/turnstile-announces-2022-north-american-tour/ Turnstile has announced a series of North American tour dates in support of their latest LP Glow on. The tour will kick off with two California shows in February 2022 before resuming in the spring, with special guests Citizen, Ceremony, Ekulu, Truth Cult and Coco & Clair Clair. Discover the group’s itinerary below. Dates of […]]]>

Turnstile has announced a series of North American tour dates in support of their latest LP Glow on. The tour will kick off with two California shows in February 2022 before resuming in the spring, with special guests Citizen, Ceremony, Ekulu, Truth Cult and Coco & Clair Clair. Discover the group’s itinerary below.

Dates of the Tourniquet 2022 tour:

February 23 – San Francisco, CA – The Regency Ballroom
February 24 – Los Angeles, California – Le Novo
April 26 – Englewood, CO – Gothic Theater
April 27 – Salt Lake City, UT – Soundwell
April 29 – Vancouver, BC – The Rickshaw Theater
April 30 – Seattle, WA – The Showbox
May 2 – Portland, OR – Roseland Theater
May 4 – Albuquerque, New Mexico – El Rey Theater
May 6 – Austin, TX – Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater
May 7 – Dallas, TX – Amplified Live
May 9 – Atlanta, GA – The Masquerade
May 10 – Nashville, TN – Brooklyn Bowl
May 12 – Milwaukee, WI – The Rave
May 13 – Minneapolis, MN – Varsity Theater
May 14 – Lawrence, KS – The Granada Theater **
May 17 – Detroit, MI – Majestic Theater
May 18 – Cleveland, OH – Agora Theater
May 19 – Toronto, ON – The Phoenix Concert Theater
May 21 – Worcester, MA – Palladium
May 23 – Brooklyn, NY – Brooklyn Steel
May 24 – Philadelphia, PA – The Fillmore Philadelphia
May 26 – Washington, DC – 9:30 am Club


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Ballard High students protest what they call a culture of sexual misconduct and harassment https://seattlewto.org/ballard-high-students-protest-what-they-call-a-culture-of-sexual-misconduct-and-harassment/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 00:34:17 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/ballard-high-students-protest-what-they-call-a-culture-of-sexual-misconduct-and-harassment/ About 100 students left Ballard High School on Monday afternoon to protest the lack of accountability for sexual misconduct and harassment at school. “On Friday I saw an abuser in the library and he smiled at me,” said Rosa Basiji, a junior at Ballard High. “I went into a bathroom with a bunch of friends, […]]]>

About 100 students left Ballard High School on Monday afternoon to protest the lack of accountability for sexual misconduct and harassment at school.

“On Friday I saw an abuser in the library and he smiled at me,” said Rosa Basiji, a junior at Ballard High. “I went into a bathroom with a bunch of friends, and I was really upset and we talked about protesting. I went back to class and just started having a panic attack.

The protest follows a string of incidents dating back to 2018, when a student was charged with sexual assault. Citing a lawsuit, the Seattle Times wrote that the student coerced a classmate into a sexual act in a school bathroom.

In October, principal Kevin Wynkoop wrote parents an email warning them about “spodies” – parties named after some sort of punch mixed in a large bin. Spores are strong drinks that, Wynkoop warned, are likely to be associated with “roofies” – drugs to further reduce a person’s inhibition.

“The idea that people can drug other students at these events is frightening and makes them even more dangerous,” he wrote. “Please tell your students about the horrible nature of the rooftops. “

Attached to that email was a picture of a flyer in the hallway. The flyer read: “There have been numerous reports of rooftops leading to sexual assault and rape of spies, please remain cautious and aware.”

Basiji, the student, said the school has organized forums to discuss these issues.

“Recently we had one, and ASB (Associated Student Body) said there are going to be changes coming, but we just wanted to have this demonstration to show how upset we are. Because we feel that we are not actually being heard or seen.

A change.org petition includes anonymous posts from students complaining about unwanted male attention – cases of teachers failing to step in when older students have become “tinkerers” with younger female students, or got stuck in the hallways.

On Monday, after the protest, Principal Wynkoop sent parents a second email. He began by saying that he supported the right of students to protest.

“Responding to sexual assault is sometimes complicated,” he said. “The vast majority take place outside of school and therefore fall outside our jurisdiction to investigate and discipline.”

He said the school was making a police report, contacting the parents and supporting “the victim in various ways,” he said.

“I understand the difficulty survivors of sexual assault have seeing their abusers in school and I can’t imagine having to deal with this trauma over and over again. (Scroll down to read the entire Wynkoop email.)

During Monday’s protest, Nicolo Potesta, a junior, said that while these issues have received attention, it seems not enough has happened.

“When we heard the school make more of these empty promises, we knew we had to do something bigger to show that we weren’t going to be appeased by promises of action without actually taking action,” said Potesta.

“In the school newspaper, The Talisman, we ran a journal like five years ago that focused on rape culture, and we were still talking about the exact same things that we are talking about today.

Protesters made a list of demands, including:

  • The school system must adopt the new regulations of Title IX.
  • Training staff with sexual assault specialists on what they can do best to support victims. (They also requested training for the students.)
  • The school must provide a therapist specializing in sexual assault at the health center.

November 8 email from Director Kevin Wynkoop:

Dear Ballard community –

I am writing to you today to inform you of a student protest that took place at school this morning and early afternoon. The students organized the demonstration of support for victims of sexual assault and the school district’s process in dealing with reports of sexual assault.

First of all, let me say that as a principal, I fully support the First Amendment rights of our students and I am very proud of their initiative and courage to speak out about the issues that matter. Issues that matter to them, issues that matter to the Ballard community and the entire school district community. Listening to their stories was overwhelming, but their mutual support was inspiring.

Responding to sexual assault is sometimes complicated, since the vast majority takes place outside of school and therefore falls outside our jurisdiction to investigate and discipline. In these cases our goal is to report to the police, contact the parents and support the victim in various ways, depending on what they report would be helpful. I sympathize with the difficulty for survivors of sexual assault seeing their abusers in school and I cannot imagine having to deal with this trauma over and over again.

Our school district also supports our students in exercising their First Amendment rights. The district has been working on changing the Title IX reporting procedure, as required by federal law, and that work is expected to be handed over to the school board next spring. It sounds like a long time, but it is important that this work is thoughtful and precise. It is important to note that the working group has a student voice subcommittee and has worked with the students to ensure that their voices are part of the conversation as the procedure is changed.

I feel fortunate to be part of the school community that prioritizes student voices and I am proud of our students today. Even when I was at the center of their anger, I was happy to see the way they came together to support each other. No one should feel pressured to take such steps and we should all fully respect the rules of consent and respect those around us.

Our next step is to organize a 2nd student forum on Wednesday November 17th from 2:40 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. in our performing arts center. I will be there and I will be accompanied by representatives of the SPS Student Civil Rights Office and other school staff to listen and answer questions. They will also conduct staff training that day to ensure staff are clear on how to receive student complaints and forward reports to administration for follow-up.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Thank you.

Keven Wynkoop

Main


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American Democrats at loggerheads over “Woke” culture after Virginia defeat https://seattlewto.org/american-democrats-at-loggerheads-over-woke-culture-after-virginia-defeat/ Sun, 07 Nov 2021 07:55:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/american-democrats-at-loggerheads-over-woke-culture-after-virginia-defeat/ Democrats on Saturday were at loggerheads over fairness and “enlightenment,” calling it a national issue blaming the culture on the recent Democratic defeat in the election in Virginia. Progressives and centrists have argued that leftists in the Joe Biden administration have opted for a culture of self-righteousness on social media by denying the realities of […]]]>

Democrats on Saturday were at loggerheads over fairness and “enlightenment,” calling it a national issue blaming the culture on the recent Democratic defeat in the election in Virginia. Progressives and centrists have argued that leftists in the Joe Biden administration have opted for a culture of self-righteousness on social media by denying the realities of public opinion that prompts many Blue Party lawmakers to abandon their principals. supporters and the general core of the party. goal.

“Woke”, mainly American slang and a past of “wake” in the political and cultural sense of the term, implies a state of awareness of issues that marginalize communities, which includes political and social issues such as racism and inequality. , but the term, which was added to the Oxford Dictionary in 2017, has been at the center of the debate and has often been presented as an insult and sarcasm. “Wokeness” entered mainstream parlance after the Black Lives Matter #BLM movement used the #staywoke hashtag which has grown globally.

A report released by The Hill on Saturday analyzed that GOP candidate Glenn Youngkin’s victory over Terry McAuliffe in the Virginia gubernatorial race, stating that Dems argued the result demonstrated “the strategic error” in the approaching the party. “Wokeness,” they believe, has belittled the spirit and support of Biden’s major party voting communities across America. Clear signs of this were first seen in the May 2020 election in Minneapolis for changing the city’s police department with a security agency. But Democrats faced a major defeat in the state where black man George Floyd was murdered by a white police officer.

‘Go to drug rehab’ awake ‘, Democratic veterinarian told Biden party

Veteran Democrats like Clinton-era strategist James Carville called the “stupid awakening” a national problem for Democrats in a TV interview with CNN’s Don Lemon, pointing out that this was precisely the reason for the Blues’ losses. .

“What didn’t work was just a stupid wake-up call. Don’t just look at Virginia and New Jersey. Look at Long Island, look at Buffalo, look at Minneapolis, even look at Seattle, Washington. I mean, that craziness. to “fund the police,” that takes Abraham Lincoln’s name out of schools. I mean – people see it, “Carville said in a statement.

The latter also warned that the “revival” would provoke repressive effects across the country on Democrats. “Go to a ‘woke up’ drug rehab or something,” he told PBS NewsHour host Judy Woodruff. He also accused Democrats of using language Americans don’t do not generally use, adding that “there is a backlash and frustration to this. Carville scoffed at such language as ‘funding the police’ which he called ‘madness’, ‘Take Abraham Lincoln’s name out of schools’ and so on.

While Carville made public comments, another Democrat who spoke on condition of anonymity said Democrats had “a long time to define these debates in the worst way possible for us,” The Hill reports, adding that the Representative Hank Johnson (D-Ga.) echoed a similar position. Awakening debates among Democrats focus on topics such as race, gender, and sexuality, as well as police, criminal justice, and education. Racial justice activist Johnetta Elzie told the newspaper that the optimism behind the “awakened” culture that was sparked by the Black Lives Matter protests in mid-2020 has been shaken.


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Suburban voters responded to GOP’s culture war speech in Virginia governor’s race and showed all politics is now national https://seattlewto.org/suburban-voters-responded-to-gops-culture-war-speech-in-virginia-governors-race-and-showed-all-politics-is-now-national/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 19:07:07 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/suburban-voters-responded-to-gops-culture-war-speech-in-virginia-governors-race-and-showed-all-politics-is-now-national/ (The Conversation is an independent, nonprofit source of information, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.) Athena M. King, Old Dominion University (THE CONVERSATION) With less than a year to go until the 2022 midterm election, political newcomer Glenn Youngkin’s resounding victory in Virginia’s race for governor demonstrated effective GOP strategy that appeals to crucial suburban […]]]>

(The Conversation is an independent, nonprofit source of information, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.)

Athena M. King, Old Dominion University

(THE CONVERSATION) With less than a year to go until the 2022 midterm election, political newcomer Glenn Youngkin’s resounding victory in Virginia’s race for governor demonstrated effective GOP strategy that appeals to crucial suburban voters alienated by Donald Trump while maintaining the support of the former president staunch supporters.

Youngkin’s campaign and the ensuing victory over former Virginia Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe put Virginia in the national spotlight. The election was a referendum not only on Trump’s influence in the GOP, but also on the failure of the Biden administration to deliver on the presidential campaign promises so far.

In the previous Virginia election, local politics was just that – local. But over the past decade, Virginia has gone from a reliable presidential red state to a reliable blue state. Starting with the election of Barack Obama in 2008, Virginia voted Democratic in the presidential election, notably for Hillary Clinton in her unsuccessful candidacy in 2016 and Joe Biden in 2020. Prior to the 2008 election, Virginians voted Republican in presidential elections of the previous 40. years.

The recent Blue Wave has placed Virginia at the heart of national politics – and made it a GOP target. Using the National Culture Wars, and in particular the GOP’s outrage over how race issues are taught in public schools, Youngkin has targeted voters in suburban Virginia and cut enough to become governor.

In addition to winning the governor’s race, the Virginia GOP saw Winsome Sears become the first black woman to become a lieutenant governor. And Republican Jason Miyares has taken over the state attorney general’s office. The Republicans also won enough seats in the House of Delegates to tie the Democrats, although a few races are still being decided. The Virginia Senate remains under Democratic control.


The blue wave in Virginia is now an open question.

Suburban GOP gains

Although Biden overwhelmingly won the Suburbs in 2020, the Youngkin campaign won a major game this year by focusing, in part, on the potential that Critical Race Theory could be taught at the K-12 level. It doesn’t, but that hasn’t stopped the spread of misinformation.

Usually reserved for graduate schools, Critical Race Theory is an area of ​​intellectual research that demonstrates the legal codification of racism in America. Instead of responding to Youngkin with the truth, McAuliffe further alienated suburban voters by saying in a debate with Youngkin that “parents shouldn’t tell schools what to teach.”

This was a major mistake and became the subject of incessant Youngkin campaign commercials in the days leading up to the November 2 election. In Fairfax County – a suburban Democratic stronghold near Washington, DC, comprising nearly 13.5% of the state’s overall vote – Youngkin’s campaign against critical race theory improved GOP’s results from 2.6 percentage points from the 2020 presidential election.

Youngkin’s strategy was also aided by McAuliffe’s inane efforts to portray the millionaire political newcomer as a sidekick of Trump.

The Trump Factor

Polls have shown the race to be a statistical stalemate leading to election day. These poll numbers remained stable on election night.

In Republican-majority counties in Virginia, for example, such as Bedford, Frederick, Roanoke and Hanover, Trump’s margin of victory in 2020 was between 37% and 60%. Youngkin kept those numbers under 1 percentage point.

Youngkin was able to maintain Trump’s base without publicly embracing Trump. GOP hopefuls who fear alienating moderate suburban Republicans are now able to follow Youngkin’s lead in downplaying their association with Trump while secretly profiting from the enthusiasm he is generating among his base.

How is Virginie going?

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines the “flagger” as “the one who takes the lead or the initiative” or “an indicator of trends”. This is the role Virginia could now play on the national political scene.

While the incumbent president’s party typically loses congressional seats midway through, emboldened Republicans, bolstered by the results in Virginia, now expect both houses to not only regain control of the GOP, but to present also to Biden the added challenge of a divided government. Both could culminate in a 2024 presidential election campaign that could very well see Trump topped the list as a Republican candidate once again.

Such enthusiasm – and the public’s alienation from Trump – could mean the difference between winning and losing in an upcoming election across the country. It could also create a new version of an old political norm: all policies are now national.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article here: https://theconversation.com/suburban-voters-responded-to-gop-culture-war-pitch-in-virginia-governors-race-and-showed-all-politics-are-now – national-171175.


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Yola, Les Skatalites, Jesse Malin, Southern Culture on the Skids, more https://seattlewto.org/yola-les-skatalites-jesse-malin-southern-culture-on-the-skids-more/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 22:04:27 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/yola-les-skatalites-jesse-malin-southern-culture-on-the-skids-more/ Here is a summary of the latest news from the tour. See the Tour Dates category for more information. YOLA Yola has added a few more dates to her 2022 North American tour, including Milwaukee, St Louis, Cincinnati and a second show in New York City (Webster Hall February 9). Go here for all dates. […]]]>

Here is a summary of the latest news from the tour. See the Tour Dates category for more information.

YOLA

Yola has added a few more dates to her 2022 North American tour, including Milwaukee, St Louis, Cincinnati and a second show in New York City (Webster Hall February 9). Go here for all dates.

AMORE BUTTON

BrooklynVegan is delighted to present Touche Amore’s first headlining tour in support of the greats of 2020 Lament, which will be open by Vein.fm and Dogleg on all dates, plus Thirdface on the first stage and Foxtails on the second.

INDIGO OF SOUZA

Indigo De Souza will be on the road in 2022 to accompany her very good second album ‘Any Shape You Take’, and she has added new dates.

2022 DECIBEL MAGAZINE TOUR (NOBITUARY, MUNICIPAL WASTE, GATECREEPER, PLUS)

Decibel Magazine’s 2022 tour was heralded with death metal legends from Tampa Obituary, thrash staples from the Richmond crossover, municipal waste, modern death metal torchbearers Gatecreeper, deathy trashers Enforced and the band ” death western “SpiritWorld (who just signed with Century Media).

SKATALITES

Jamaican ska veterans The Skatalites have a few North American dates on their schedule, including the Global Ska Fest in Mexico City this month, New York (Cafe Wha on 11/24) and California dates in December (House of Blues Anaheim 04 12 with Aquabats and more). All dates are here.

DESTRUCTIVE

Destroyer has announced dates for its North American tour in 2022, starting April 22 in Vancouver and including stops in Seattle, Boise, St. Louis, Nashville, DC, Philadelphia, Brooklyn, Montreal, Toronto, Austin, Los Angeles, Berkeley, Portland and more.

WAXAHATCHEE / MADI DIAZ

Waxahatchee has announced another round of tour dates to support the excellent Saint Cloud (order on vinyl). After performing at Wilco’s Sky Blue Sky Fest in Mexico in January, she’ll hit the road in February, stopping in Richmond, Providence, Brooklyn, Cleveland, Toronto, Chicago and more. In April, she has two dates (rescheduled from this year) at Union Transfer in Philadelphia, and after that, she has a set at the Bluebird Music Festival in April, a show with Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit in May, and a date at the New Boston Roadrunner in June.

SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKID

The big names in cowpunk Southern Culture on the Skids will be on tour in 2022 with dates scheduled throughout the year, including an LA show at Zebulon on June 17th and a Brooklyn show at the Bell House on the 16th. September. They’re probably playing somewhere near you – – check out their full schedule.

JESSE MALIN

Jesse Malin is currently touring Europe with Brian Fallon and Chris Farren, but will return to New York City later this fall for his annual Holiday Show at the Bowery Ballroom on December 11. Generation D classmate Howie Pyro battling cirrhosis of the liver. All of Jesse Malin’s dates are here.


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Funding available for arts / culture / creative types and businesses https://seattlewto.org/funding-available-for-arts-culture-creative-types-and-businesses/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 18:19:26 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/funding-available-for-arts-culture-creative-types-and-businesses/ Below are a number of relief / recovery funding opportunities available to the City of Seattle and King County, some ending next week (listed chronologically by deadline): 4Culture & ARTS Sustained support + Stimulus fund – ends November 5King County Cultural Organizations, you can apply for three grants through one application, and the deadline is […]]]>

Below are a number of relief / recovery funding opportunities available to the City of Seattle and King County, some ending next week (listed chronologically by deadline):

4Culture & ARTS Sustained support + Stimulus fund – ends November 5
King County Cultural Organizations, you can apply for three grants through one application, and the deadline is this Friday. 4Culture and the City of Seattle Arts and Culture Office have teamed up to create a single application process for several grant programs in King County and the City of Seattle.

Apply before Friday, November 5 at 5:00 p.m. to be considered for the continued support of 4Culture, the 4Culture recovery funds and the Seattle Arts and Culture Office recovery funds. Register for tomorrow’s information workshop on https://bit.ly/recoveryfundws2.

Small Business Stabilization Fund – closes November 9
Creative small businesses AND arts nonprofit organizations are eligible for the Seattle Office of Economic Development’s Small Business Stabilization Fund.

Key information for this new cycle:

    • The Fund will provide grants of $ 5,000, $ 10,000 and $ 20,000.
    • Small businesses with up to 50 full-time equivalent employees can apply.
    • Businesses that have received a stabilization fund in previous cycles can apply.
    • An additional $ 4 million is invested to stabilize micro and small businesses negatively impacted by the health crisis.

If you require assistance with completing the online application, language access services, accommodation, or accessibility information, please contact 206-684-8090 or [email protected]. Apply before November 9: seattle.gov/SmallBusinessStabilizationFund.

Funding available for arts / culture / creative types and businesses 2

King County Festivals & Events Fund – ends November 11
The King County Festival and Grants Program aims to meet the needs of event and festival producers (large and small) seeking to restore community activities, events, festivals and celebrations to a safe environment, while engaging residents and tourists. throughout the county and employing workers, working creatives and culture bearers at events. Apply before 11:59 p.m. on November 11 at kingcountycreative.com/festival-events-fund/.

Seattle Relief Fund – ends November 15
One-time financial assistance for eligible Seattle residents affected by the COVID-19 pandemic is now available. Prices will range from $ 1,000 to $ 3,000 depending on the size of the household. This funding is intended for any low-income Seattle resident, regardless of citizenship or immigrant status, as long as they meet the eligibility requirements.

Learn more about the Seattle Relief Fund and apply by November 15 at 11:59 p.m.: seattlerelief.com. Information translated into eight languages.

Funding available for arts / culture / creative types and businesses 3

Arts in the Parks Program – ends December 1
The Bureau of Arts and Culture is partnering with Seattle Parks and Recreation to expand arts and community events in city parks. The The Arts in Parks program is an opportunity for the city to invest in the dynamic cultural work being done in and by various Seattle communities.

This grant supports new and established festivals or events that promote the arts and cultural participation, celebrate diversity, build community connections, and activate parks through arts and culture while connecting with communities most affected by systemic oppression, including low-income people, people with disabilities, immigrants and refugee communities, and communities of color. Apply before 5 p.m. on December 1: http://www.seattle.gov/arts/programs/grants/arts-in-parks-program

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