Seattle culture – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 14:11:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://seattlewto.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Seattle culture – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ 32 32 Soccer Mommy shares video for new song “Bones” https://seattlewto.org/soccer-mommy-shares-video-for-new-song-bones/ Wed, 18 May 2022 14:02:50 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/soccer-mommy-shares-video-for-new-song-bones/ Soccer Mommy released the latest single from their upcoming album Sometimes forever. It’s called “Bones,” and it arrives with a video from director Alex Ross Perry, who also did the visual for color theory‘yellow is the color of his eyes’. She also announced a series of in-store shows in the UK. Check out the new […]]]>

Soccer Mommy released the latest single from their upcoming album Sometimes forever. It’s called “Bones,” and it arrives with a video from director Alex Ross Perry, who also did the visual for color theory‘yellow is the color of his eyes’. She also announced a series of in-store shows in the UK. Check out the new song and check out Soccer Mommy’s tour schedule below.

“‘Bones’ is a song about struggling with the parts of yourself that you don’t like in a relationship,” Sophie Allison explained in a press release. “It’s about wanting to become better for someone and feeling like you’re on your own path.”

“Bones” follows previously shared singles “Shotgun” and “Unholy Affliction,” which both landed on our Best New Songs segment. Sometimes foreverwhich was executive produced by Daniel Lopatin of Oneohtrix Point Never, will be released June 24 via Loma Vista.

2022 Soccer Mommy Tour Dates:

June 10 – New York, NY – Bowery Ballroom
June 12 – New York, NY – Governors Ball Festival
June 24 – Margate, UK – Leisure Festival
June 27 – Bristol, UK – Canons Marsh Amphitheater %
June 28 – Dublin, Ireland – Trinity College*
June 30 – Vilanova i la Geltru, Spain @ Vida Festival
August 8 – Seattle, WA – Day In Day Out Festival
August 31 – Nottingham, UK – Rescue Rooms
September 1 – Brighton, UK – Chalk
September 1-4 – Salisbury, UK – End of the Road Festival
September 3 – Bristol, UK – Trinity
September 5 – Cologne, DE – Bumann & Sohn
September 6 – Hamburg, DE – Molotow
September 8 – Stockholm, SE – Slaktkyrkan
September 9 – Oslo, NO – John Dee
September 10 – Copenhagen, DK – Loppen
September 12 – Berlin, DE – Frannz Club
September 13 – Bremen, DE – Lagerhaus
September 15 – Amsterdam, Netherlands – Bitterzoet
September 16 – Nijmegen, Netherlands – Merleyn
September 17 – Brussels, BE – Rotonde @ Botanique
September 18 – Paris, FR – Petit Bain
September 20 – Manchester, UK – O2 Ritz
September 21 – Cardiff, UK – Tramshed
September 22 – London, UK – O2 Forum
September 23 – Birmingham, UK – The Castle and the Falcon
September 24 – Glasgow, UK – Queen Margaret Union
October 28 – Indianapolis, IN – Hi-Fi Annex &
October 29 – Madison, WI – Majestic Theater &
October 30 – Minneapolis, MN – First Avenue &
November 1 – Chicago, IL – Metro and
November 4 – Buffalo, NY – Town Ballroom &
November 5 – North Adams, MA – Mass MOCA and
November 6 – Boston, MA – House of Blues &
November 11 – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – Franklin Music Hall ^
Nov. 12 – Washington, DC – 9:30 a.m. Club^
November 14 – Saxapahaw, NC – Haw River Ballroom^
November 16 – Charlotte, NC – Neighborhood Theater ^
November 17 – Atlanta, GA – Masquerade Heaven Stage^
November 18 – Birmingham, AL – Saturn^
November 19 – Nashville, TN – Brooklyn Bowl^
November 30 – St. Louis, MO – Pageant #
December 2 – ft. Collins, CO–Washington#
December 3 – Denver, CO – Ogden Theater #
December 4 – Salt Lake City, UT – The Depot#
December 7 – Vancouver, BC – Commodore #
December 8 – Portland, OR – Crystal Ballroom#
December 10 – Oakland, CA – Fox Theater #
December 11 – Santa Ana, CA – The Observatory #
December 13 – Los Angeles, CA – The Wiltern#
December 14 – Phoenix, AZ – The Van Buren#
December 16 – Austin, TX – Emo’s East#
Dec. 17 – Dallas, TX – House of Blues#

% with the war on drugs
* with Haim
& with Lightning Bug support
^ with support from Helena Deland
# with the support of TOPS

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Gorillaz Announces 2022 North American Tour https://seattlewto.org/gorillaz-announces-2022-north-american-tour/ Mon, 16 May 2022 16:02:18 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/gorillaz-announces-2022-north-american-tour/ Gorillaz has announced a series of North American tour dates scheduled for the fall. Kicking off in Vancouver on Sept. 11, the trek will mark the group’s first U.S. and Canadian shows since 2018. Tickets go on general sale at 10 a.m. local time on Friday, May 20. Check out the band’s full schedule below. […]]]>

Gorillaz has announced a series of North American tour dates scheduled for the fall. Kicking off in Vancouver on Sept. 11, the trek will mark the group’s first U.S. and Canadian shows since 2018. Tickets go on general sale at 10 a.m. local time on Friday, May 20. Check out the band’s full schedule below.

Gorrilaz 2022 Tour Dates:

May 18 Curitiba, Brazil – Curitiba Side Show
May 21 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – Mita Festival
June 2 Paris, France – We Love Green
June 4 Barcelona, ​​Spain – Primavera Sound
June 9 Barcelona, ​​Spain – Primavera Sound
June 11 Porto, Portugal – NOS Primavera Sound
June 15 Vienna, France – Roman Theater
June 17 Nîmes, France – Arena of Nîmes
June 19 Rotselaar, Belgium – Werchter Boutique
June 22 Cologne, Germany – Tanzbrunnen
June 24 Berlin, Germany – Kindl-Bühne Wuhlheide
June 26 Esch Sur Alzette, Luxembourg – Rockhal
July 2 Beuningen, Netherlands – Down The Rabbit Hole
July 5 Verona, Italy – Verona Arena
July 22 Byron Bay, Australia – Splendor in the Grass Festival
July 24 Melbourne, Australia – John Cain Arena
July 26 Sydney, Australia – Qudos Bank Arena
August 4 Stockholm, Sweden – Skansen
August 6 Skanderborg, Denmark – Smukfest
August 10 Oslo, Norway – Øyafestivalen
August 17 Dublin, Ireland – 3Arena
August 19 London, England – All Points East
September 11 Vancouver, British Columbia – Rogers Arena!
September 12 Seattle, WA – Climate Pledge Arena!
September 14 Portland, OR – Moda Center!
September 17 Las Vegas, NV – Life is Beautiful Festival!
September 19 Salt Lake City, UT – Vivint Smart Home Arena!
September 21 San Francisco, CA – Chase Center!
September 23 Los Angeles, CA – Forum Kia!
September 26 Phoenix, AZ – Footprint Center!
September 28 Denver, CO – Ball Arena!
September 30 Austin, TX – Moody Center!
Oct 1 Irving, TX – Toyota Music Factory Pavilion!
October 3 Chicago, IL – United Center!
October 5 Detroit, MI – Little Caesars Arena!
October 6 Toronto, Ontario – Scotiabank Arena!
October 8 Montreal, Quebec – Center Bell!
October 11 Boston, MA – TD Garden!
October 12 Brooklyn, NY – Barclays Center!
October 14 Philadelphia, PA – The Philadelphia Met!
October 17 Columbia, MD – Merriweather Post Pavilion!
October 19 Alpharetta, GA – Ameris Bank Amphitheater!
October 21 Orlando, Florida – Amway Center*
October 23 Miami, Florida – FTX Zone*

! with EarthGang
* with Jungle

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Thunder Island Brewing Hosts IPA Launch Party for Third Culture Kids with Reuben’s Brews https://seattlewto.org/thunder-island-brewing-hosts-ipa-launch-party-for-third-culture-kids-with-reubens-brews/ Tue, 10 May 2022 13:51:24 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/thunder-island-brewing-hosts-ipa-launch-party-for-third-culture-kids-with-reubens-brews/ Thunder Island Brewing and Reuben’s Brews launch Reuben’s Brews Third Culture Kids IPA. (image courtesy of Thunder Island Brewing) Two breweries, Thunder Island Brewery of Oregon and Ruben’s beers from Washington, recently came together to each brew an IPA for Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Each brewery brewed its own version of a […]]]>
Thunder Island Brewing and Reuben’s Brews launch Reuben’s Brews Third Culture Kids IPA. (image courtesy of Thunder Island Brewing)

Two breweries, Thunder Island Brewery of Oregon and Ruben’s beers from Washington, recently came together to each brew an IPA for Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Each brewery brewed its own version of a beer named IPA for Third Culture Kids. Thunder Island brewed a Pacific Northwest IPA while Reuben’s Brews brewed a Cold IPA.

Since both breweries have co-owners of Korean descent, they have chosen to brew these two IPAs which will be released during the month of May, which also happens to be Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of each beer will be donated to two different organizations. The Thunder Island PNW API will benefit IRCO Pacific Islander and Asian Family Center, a non-profit organization committed to promoting the integration of refugees, immigrants and the community at large into a self-sufficient, healthy and inclusive multi-ethnic society. . Reuben’s Brews Cold IPA will benefit the nonprofit Families of Color Seattle.

On Wednesday, May 11 from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., Thunder Island Brewing will release both versions of IPA for Third Culture Kids at his brewery in Cascade Locks, Oregon. For the price of a pint, Thunder Island Brewing will offer an 8oz pour of the Cold IPA co-brewed at Reuben’s facility in Seattle and an 8oz pour of the PNW IPA brewed by Thunder Island for side-by-side tasting. coast.

Both versions of IPA for Third Culture Kids will be available in Draft in the Thunder Island Dining Hall for you to enjoy. If you want to take beers to go, both beers will be available in crowler or growler refills. Rueben’s Brews Cold IPA will also be available as a take-out 6-pack.

Reuben's Brews Third Culture Kids IPA
Reuben’s Brews Third Culture Kids IPA

Here are details on how this collaboration came to be, as provided to us by Thunder Island Brewing…

THE STORY BEHIND THE COLLABORATION
Who are the children of the third culture? They are children whose family life is rooted in a culture, which differs from the culture outside the front door. They are children who grew up in a different country from their parents and find themselves explaining family customs or food to friends and neighbors. And these are children who sometimes navigate gracefully across multiple cultures, but sometimes stumble and feel like strangers. They are the children of our globalized world.

While third culture children each have their own experiences, there is a common understanding that people with this mixed identity share. That’s what brought Caroline Park Lipps, owner of Thunder Island Brewing Company, and our very own Grace Kim Robbings together. After connecting over their Korean heritage, the two discovered they had a lot in common. Both are brewery owners who started businesses with their spouses, expanded their breweries while raising families, and adopted their Korean maiden names as their middle names when they got married.

Caroline and Grace admitted to each other that they sometimes feel like “bad Koreans” because they don’t quite fit the mold, but they are proud of their heritage nonetheless. Neither is fluent in Korean, but as kids they understood enough to know when they were in trouble. Or, in the case of Grace and her sister Liz (who also works here), only know chosen words for things their parents didn’t want them to say in English.

IPAS THIRD CULTURE CHILDREN
A collaboration seemed meant to be. Although each brewery has worked with many others in the past, this partnership differed by putting the female founders first. Eventually, they decided to brew two different beers. Caroline wanted a true Pacific Northwest IPA to celebrate her father who helped instill a love of craft beer by sharing IPAs with her. Grace and Liz wanted a Cold IPA. They felt that this hybrid style—an IPA fermented on lager yeast—represented their experience as Hapa, people of partial Asian or Pacific Islander descent. Their American mother met their Korean father when she was a Peace Corps volunteer in South Korea in the 1960s.

Thunder Island Brewing Co.
601 Wa Na Pa Street
Cascade Locks, OR 97014

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Student voices: social and emotional learning can create a culture of understanding in schools https://seattlewto.org/student-voices-social-and-emotional-learning-can-create-a-culture-of-understanding-in-schools/ Sat, 07 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/student-voices-social-and-emotional-learning-can-create-a-culture-of-understanding-in-schools/ Editor’s note: This essay is part of the Seattle Times’ Student Voices program for young writers. Meet the authors and read other 2022 essays at st.news/studentvoices2022. For most of my life, I believed that difficulties were something to hide. Living in a poor family, I grew up in a moldy house with rotting wood, infested […]]]>

Editor’s note: This essay is part of the Seattle Times’ Student Voices program for young writers. Meet the authors and read other 2022 essays at st.news/studentvoices2022.

For most of my life, I believed that difficulties were something to hide.

Living in a poor family, I grew up in a moldy house with rotting wood, infested with rats and insects. Money came and went, but over the years it only seemed to do the latter. My family lived on food stamps and poverty wages, never knowing how long they would last. I was 5 years old when my brothers were placed in foster care, 7 years old when my father lost his job. Three years later, our house was seized; we were expelled. I was 10 when my family was three days away from the street.

My sense of worth and safety crumbled as my home environment crumbled. With no caring family to rely on, I felt isolated, unsupported and scared. With no one to confide in and no space to express vulnerability, school only cemented my feelings. From an early age, I felt compelled to maintain a trying front of normalcy in school as I silently withered from within. Since the vulnerability was barely revealed by others, I thought it was forbidden.

If my schools had successfully implemented a social and emotional learning program, I would have learned valuable skills in processing my emotions and felt encouraged to seek help in a more compassionate environment. SEL teaches students how to manage their emotions, set goals, build healthy relationships, and make decisions to prepare them for success in school and in life.

Unfortunately, my school did not offer this program.

Five days a week, I was immersed in a class of students and educators who didn’t know what poverty entailed or how mental illnesses, like depression, affected children. Although I experienced both, I lacked the vocabulary and understanding of my dire situation to learn how to cope.

Once, in third grade, shortly after my father lost his job, family tensions became unbearable. Our television and internet had been cut off, and my siblings and I had spent our days cooped up inside. I would nap all day to pass the time, finding little joy in the hobbies I loved. In addition to food stamps, we relied on our local food bank for many of our meals. Often receiving rancid foods, we selected their edible parts.

Driven by a sense of inadequacy, I lost engagement in class activities and started talking to my second-grade teacher. I still remember the first time I deviated from my complacent attitude and made a sarcastic remark during his instruction. After class, she pulled me aside to speak in an unempathetic tone that, to this day, sends shivers down my spine: “Your behavior today was rude and disrespectful.” After scolding me, she left without asking why I had acted as I had done, revealing no trace of concern.

Later that year, similar cases brought me to the school counselor’s office where adults tried to tell me how I felt with picture books and feeling charts that oversimplified the complexity of my experiences.

I was never simply asked if I was okay. I never felt safe to honestly voice my concerns or ask for the support I needed. Over time, I closed myself off, attending class dispassionately and holding my misery from within. Throughout my childhood, school treated me like a problem. It never helped me find a solution.

When students enter educational institutions, we cannot leave behind our outer lives. Even if all classes were taught the same, setting equal expectations and standards for all, it would not account for the disparate experiences outside of school that foment inequity from within.

If schools expect students to care about learning, they must care about our well-being. We must abandon the idea that personal life is independent of academic life. Researchers have documented how poverty and classroom engagement are interconnected.

There needs to be genuine and ongoing efforts by schools to explore methods of integrating social and emotional learning into school culture and outreach. SEL techniques can help students recognize their emotions, manage them, develop social awareness, make responsible decisions, and build healthy relationships.

To begin with, teachers need extensive training in SEL and should regularly model and encourage students to use these skills. By normalizing communication and vulnerability, teachers can build rapport with students, helping them feel comfortable doing the same.

One such positive SEL role model is my wonderful teacher, Mrs. Haines. By connecting with each of her students and seeking to understand their identity, Ms. Haines creates a nurturing environment where her students feel safe to express themselves and seek support.

Recently, our class started student-led conversations where my classmates and I anonymously ask questions through a form and discuss them as a whole. Ms. Haines also participates in these conversations, sharing her honest opinions and reflecting on those of others, which has encouraged us to reciprocate. In activities like these, we address uncomfortable topics such as mental health, racism and misogyny in our community and in the world at large. These discussions helped me gain comfort and confidence in solving pressing problems inside and outside the classroom and inspired me to seek solutions.

SEL practices also help educators manage each student’s unique schedules and challenges. They can recognize and help young people caring for family members, working after school, and struggling with mental health issues by offering one-on-one tutoring or time extensions.

To ensure that implementation is going well, schools should regularly survey and discuss with students which SEL components are effective and where efforts should be focused for districts, schools, and even students themselves.

An unsuccessfully integrated and targeted SEL can be unproductive or harmful. Some of my early SEL experiences in school involved oversimplified lessons that trivialized the complexity of mental health and real-life conflict. For years I thought my depression was just sadness, my anxiety was just nervousness, that I was making something out of nothing. To avoid fomenting these views in students, schools must abandon the misguided idealism that SEL administered in any form is “a cure for all.”

Just as hardship hinders the lives of students, SEL, when explored collaboratively, fosters a vital means of advancement. What works in one school may not work in another. We should not wait for a solution to present itself, but rather seek our own collaboratively by implementing and reviewing new methods as school communities.

SEL skills are applicable to all facets of life: both personal and academic, to ourselves and to the world. Above all, social and emotional learning is applicable in our schools.

It’s time to give SEL a chance.

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The Canucks developed a better locker room culture as players found their voice https://seattlewto.org/the-canucks-developed-a-better-locker-room-culture-as-players-found-their-voice/ Fri, 06 May 2022 23:42:56 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/the-canucks-developed-a-better-locker-room-culture-as-players-found-their-voice/ Breadcrumb Links Vancouver Canucks Sports NHL Hockey “I thought this year’s group came together in the venue as well as I saw it during my time here. It’s not quite there, but it’s definitely in the right direction.” —Tyler Myers Conor Garland of the Vancouver Canucks falls to the ground as he kicks a soccer […]]]>

“I thought this year’s group came together in the venue as well as I saw it during my time here. It’s not quite there, but it’s definitely in the right direction.” —Tyler Myers

Content of the article

A team’s culture is not something a coach or general manager can simply pronounce. It is something to be encouraged.

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During Bruce Boudreau’s tenure as head coach of the Vancouver Canucks, it became clear that a new culture emerged.

It’s really a pretty simple thing. Have human relationships with your players and use emotional intelligence in these relationships.

“I think I’m pretty positive and it’s all about winning,” Boudreau said this week. “And I think it didn’t take long for everyone to realize that. It didn’t matter what we were doing. It was about winning. And I think that’s called a great culture to have. And so it starts with practice. It starts with wanting to win every game, I think.

In fostering a team culture, a coach must know their athletes and set a strong, positive example. Players should be encouraged to express themselves freely and have the freedom to take risks on and off the pitch.

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“Let them make mistakes. Let them own it,” said Francois Ratier, a Quebec-based coaching consultant. it’s getting better.”

Since the departure of Jacob Markstrom and Chris Tanev after the 2019-20 season, there has been a lot of talk about the important leadership roles they filled in the Canucks locker room and how those holes remained empty after their departures.

It’s clear from the comments Boudreau and his players have made over the past few weeks that that void has gone, that this current generation of Canucks have finally found their collective identity. And every player, whether naturally talkative or not, feels empowered to express themselves.

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When Boudreau arrived in early December, the Canucks had won just eight of their first 25 games. Nothing they did seemed to work.

But winning builds confidence. And the Canucks immediately won. That their success, mainly due to the game of goalkeeper Thatcher Demko, did not matter for the renewal of the spirit of the team.

They were winning and that’s all that matters.

“As we started to win, you could hear more in the room. It was more of a real positive piece than a negative piece. And there was no more ‘unhappiness to me,’” recalls Boudreau.

Tyler Myers agreed with Boudreau’s assessment.

“He’s awesome,” Myers said. “You find out pretty quickly that Bruce is a pretty positive person. Even though we went through some lulls, still very positive.

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“He’s in the locker room and kept the guys upbeat. And I think the way we played as a group shows what we think of him. I think the band played really hard for him. It’s a testament to what he did when he arrived.

The team had a handful of leaders, like Bo Horvat and JT Miller, who were known to speak out in one way or another. But a truly vibrant team culture means everyone feels comfortable speaking up, being able to lead, regardless of their role on the team.

Conor Garland (middle) of the Vancouver Canucks celebrates his goal with Quinn Hughes (left) and Luke Schenn during the third period against the Seattle Kraken at Climate Pledge Arena on January 1, 2022 in Seattle, Washington.
Conor Garland (middle) of the Vancouver Canucks celebrates his goal with Quinn Hughes (left) and Luke Schenn during the third period against the Seattle Kraken at Climate Pledge Arena on January 1, 2022 in Seattle, Washington. Photo by Steph Chambers /Getty Images

And so silent players started talking more. It wasn’t just quiet leaders like Demko and Elias Pettersson, it was actors like Alex Chiasson.

“Even normal calm guys at the end, like Chiasson. I mean, everyone respects his voice. He won a cup and when he started playing and doing well, he started talking,” Boudreau said.

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“And then Millsy and Horvat, and everyone was in on this thing. The Luke Schenns and the Tyler Myers and everything. It was a whole bunch of guys pointing in one direction.

“That’s the mindset I want to see when players come to this team, that they expect to win, because when you expect to win, if you see someone not working as well hard than you or do things that you are capable of, that you are ready to do it and they will not do it, you let them know, ”added Boudreau.

“Then the leadership in the room gets bigger and stronger. And it becomes your way of playing and your way of life.

Gone are the days when young players simply had to defer to veterans on the team, Myers said.

“You want to see young people express themselves,” he said. “Just because a guy is young doesn’t mean he has to stay quiet in his corner.”

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Conor Garland pointed to a speech the normally silent Quinn Hughes gave at the end of the season as an example of culture change. The high-octane defenseman told his teammates that just because they weren’t in the pursuit of the playoffs anymore, doesn’t mean they can’t come out strong every night.

“Try to change the culture. You know, this team hasn’t made the playoffs in a while and you know, we want to be a group that takes this team to the playoffs and competes for the Stanley Cup year after year, so it has to start somewhere. was the message Hughes had for his teammates, Garland said.

Myers noted that Hughes’ speech was somewhat obligatory as he had just received the team’s Player of the Game belt, but what Hughes had to say was nonetheless impactful.

“The words he said, you can tell he’s growing as a player and a person in the room, becoming one of the leaders,” Myers said.

“I thought this year’s band came together in the hall as well as I saw it during my time here.

“It’s not quite there, but it’s definitely heading in the right direction.”

pjohnston@postmedia.com

twitter.com/risingaction

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A ‘culture changer’, Seahawks CB Coby Bryant in good company with Jim Thorpe award https://seattlewto.org/a-culture-changer-seahawks-cb-coby-bryant-in-good-company-with-jim-thorpe-award/ Thu, 05 May 2022 22:31:02 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/a-culture-changer-seahawks-cb-coby-bryant-in-good-company-with-jim-thorpe-award/ When the Seahawks used their fourth-round pick 109th overall on cornerback Coby Bryant, they selected the winner of the 2021 Jim Thorpe Award. Since 1986, this prestigious honor chosen by the Sports Hall of Fame of Oklahoma recognizes the top defensive back in college football for this season. Interestingly, Bryant won the award over Cincinnati […]]]>

When the Seahawks used their fourth-round pick 109th overall on cornerback Coby Bryant, they selected the winner of the 2021 Jim Thorpe Award. Since 1986, this prestigious honor chosen by the Sports Hall of Fame of Oklahoma recognizes the top defensive back in college football for this season.

Interestingly, Bryant won the award over Cincinnati teammate Ahmad “Sauce” Gardner, who was taken fourth overall by the Jets in the first round. Gardner certainly generated more buzz and hype ahead of the draft and that’s understandable. At 6-foot-3 with a speed of 4.4, he has all the traits you want in an NFL corner.

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Sound Lab reopens at the Museum of Pop Culture https://seattlewto.org/sound-lab-reopens-at-the-museum-of-pop-culture/ Tue, 03 May 2022 21:04:45 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/sound-lab-reopens-at-the-museum-of-pop-culture/ The Museum of Pop Culture is a leading nonprofit museum in Seattle dedicated to the ideas and risk-taking that fuel contemporary pop culture. Currently, the traveling exhibit, Contact High: A Visual History of Hip-Hop, along with a host of main exhibits covering science fiction, music, video games, and more. are on display. See the full […]]]>

The Museum of Pop Culture is a leading nonprofit museum in Seattle dedicated to the ideas and risk-taking that fuel contemporary pop culture. Currently, the traveling exhibit, Contact High: A Visual History of Hip-Hop, along with a host of main exhibits covering science fiction, music, video games, and more. are on display. See the full list here. For tickets and information, visit MoPOP.org.

MoPOP recently announced the reopening of its popular Sound Lab hands-on exhibit and that Ruth E. Carter: Afrofuturism in Costume Design will open on June 18, featuring over 60 works from films including Black Panther, Do the Right Thing, Selma, Malcolm X , and more. More information at MoPOP.org/RuthCarter.

The Museum is also participating in GiveBIG today and tomorrow, May 3 and 4. To learn more about supporting the work and programs produced by the Museum, please visit us here.

Here’s what else is happening this month at MoPOP – both in-person and virtual:

17th Annual Sci-Fi + Fantasy Short Film Festival

May 21-22

Science Fiction + Fantasy Short Film Festival (SFFSFF) is an annual event organized by MoPOP and SIFF to celebrate new and innovative additions to science fiction and fantasy film arts. Now in its 17th year, SFFSFF screens animated and live-action sci-fi and fantasy films from around the world, which are then judged by nationally recognized film critics.

This hugely popular festival has sold out for the past ten consecutive years, filling the room with enthusiastic fans from the area’s sci-fi, fantasy and film communities. Last year we hosted our first-ever digital showcase, inviting fans around the world to see the latest and greatest in genre films. This year we have two in-person screenings in addition to a virtual option. SFFSFF’s films have also received international distribution and garnered interest from a wide network of moviegoers – even receiving Oscar nominations, museum exhibits, and more.

Sensory evening at MoPOP

May 12

Join us for our sensory programs, an opportunity for adults and families to experience the museum with reduced volume and light levels. Sensory programs are a free opportunity for anyone who can benefit from a low-sensory museum environment.

MoPOP Matinee takeover with community screenings from other local nonprofits in Sound + Vision Theater

From March to June, Three Dollar Bill Cinema is in the director’s chair, showcasing the best in queer horror shorts. MoPOP’s Sound + Vision Theater will play programming chosen exclusively by our partner for two screenings each opening day.

Take a break from our exhibits, see something you’ve never seen before, and find out what’s happening with our friends in Seattle. Screenings are included in your general admission ticket at no additional cost, making MoPOP Matinee Takeovers an easy and fun addition to your museum experience.

Awaken your curiosity about pop culture: MoPOP launches an online collection vault

While several hundred items from the MoPOP collection are on display in the museum at any one time, over 80,000 pieces are in our custody. MoPOP’s permanent collection – much of which is stored in a physical “vault” – spans the breadth of the pop culture canon and also showcases one of the finest assemblages of popular music-related artifacts that exist. We invite you to spark your curiosity about pop culture with our online collection vault which features a sampling of objects from our permanent collection, selected by our curators and organized into content areas.

Graphic Novels Student Clubs

MoPOP’s virtual Graphic Novels Club offers students a unique opportunity to connect with other nerds while cultivating a natural love for reading. Each month, we’ll use a graphic novel (or two) to explore social justice topics and issues such as LGBTQ+ and black histories, climate change, immigrant equity, and more. With separate tracks for readers ages 9-11 and 12-14, sessions will alternate between book discussions and creative art inspired by our favorite cartoonists and graphic novelists.

Meetings are held April through June via Zoom on Tuesdays from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. PT. Sign up for any (or all!) of the months you want. MAY DATES: May 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31

Summer Camps – ON SALE NOW

Professional teacher artists lead MoPOP experiences where campers create original music videos, explore fantasy worlds, learn about the world of drag or design their own exhibits. Programs begin in July for students in grades 2 through 12. Get more information here >>

Camp rock ‘n’ roll music video

July 18-22, 8:45 a.m.-4:00 p.m., 10-13 years old

Create a fantasy camp

July 25-29, 8:45 a.m.-4:00 p.m., ages 7-10

Make a museum camp

From August 1 to 5, from 8:45 a.m. to 4 p.m., from 10 to 13 years old

*WAITING LIST* Drag-tastic Summer Camp: The Art of Drag

August 8-12, 8:45 a.m.-4:00 p.m., 12-18 years old

HOME SCHOOL OPPORTUNITIES

Homeschool Days – FUNdamentals of Hip-Hop

MAY DATE: May 19

MoPOP provides a unique opportunity for homeschooled students and their families to participate in themed and hands-on experiences centered around museum exhibits and content.

Each homeschool day includes a different student-centered workshop led by a professional teaching artist, a guided gallery experience, and free time to explore our exciting and interactive exhibits. Your family will be encouraged to work together, ask questions and interact with the content of our museum.

*VIRTUAL* Introduction to Graphic Novels and Comic Drawing

MAY DATES: May 6

Join comic book artist Kane Lynch for a special live workshop focused on the “how to” of graphic novels and comics! From technical terms to panel structures and drawing basics to pencil effects, we will explore the art of drawing and storytelling. Take this course alone or apply what you’ve learned to our From Sketches to Scrwls workshop series

*VIRTUAL* From Sketches to Scribbles: Graphic Novel Workshop Series

MAY DATES: May 20, 27

Have you ever wanted to learn the work behind comics and graphic novels? Join us and professional comic artist Kane Lynch as we explore the world of graphic novels and other longer-form comic projects in this special series of 3-week Livestream Workshops! We’ll go hands-on and in-depth to learn pencil drawing and character design, background inking and coloring, lettering techniques, story structure, and more. Students will leave this series of workshops armed with the tools they will need to create their own graphic novels or comic books.

Contact High: A visual history of hip-hop

October 16, 2021 – March 2023

They say a picture is worth 1,000 words, and that’s especially true for one of the most language-sensitive musical genres: hip-hop. Contact High explores four decades of photography, from the late 1970s to the present day, documenting a revolution not only in music, but also in politics, race relations, fashion and culture. Through over 170 iconic images of hip-hop’s most influential artists (Missy Elliott, Jay-Z, Queen Latifah, Tupac, and more) – including contact sheets that give us rare insight into the creative process of a photo shoot – Contact High examines the evolution of hip-hop, connecting us with the experiences, identities and places that have shaped the world’s most popular musical genre.

Exhibition highlights include:

Exclusive footage of some of hip-hop’s biggest influences, including Missy Elliot, Jay-Z, Queen Latifah, Kanye West and Tupac Shakur.

Over 75 never-before-seen contact sheets ranging from iconic Notorious BIG portraits of Barron Claiborne to images of Aaliyah, the Wu-Tang Clan, Sir Mix-A-Lot and Kanye West.

The Dapper Dan jacket made for Rakim and MF DOOM mask.

In addition to photographs, artifacts from MoPOP’s permanent collection such as early rap fight flyers, Grandmaster Flash turntables, Tupac Shakur manuscripts, Flavor magazines, and costumes from Sha-Rock and The Notorious BIG, add to our understanding of hip-hop culture.

A short documentary featuring Contact High photographers at work and in conversation, including Barron Claiborne, Brian “B+” Cross, Eric Coleman, Estevan Oriol, Jorge Peniche, Jamel Shabazz, Janette Beckman, Joe Conzo, Jack McKain, Dana Scruggs and Danny Pick Up. The film is produced by the Annenberg Foundation and Radical Media.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF POP CULTURE

MoPOP is a leading nonprofit museum in Seattle dedicated to the ideas and risk-taking that fuel contemporary pop culture. With a mission to make creative expression a life-changing force by providing experiences that inspire and connect our communities, MoPOP reaches multi-generational audiences through our collections, exhibitions, educational programs and community partnerships. At MoPOP, artists, audiences, and ideas converge, bringing understanding, interpretation, and scholarship to the pop culture of our time. For more information, visit MoPOP.org.

CONNECT WITH MoPOP:

MoPOP.org

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The Johnny Depp case brings stan culture into the courtroom https://seattlewto.org/the-johnny-depp-case-brings-stan-culture-into-the-courtroom/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 02:38:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/the-johnny-depp-case-brings-stan-culture-into-the-courtroom/ A frenetic scene is materializing four days a week at the Fairfax County Courthouse in Virginia as fans seek seats in the libel trial between Johnny Depp and his ex-wife Amber Heard. The queue to enter the courthouse begins before sunrise. Throughout the day, people appear carrying signs, wearing fan merch and costumes, even walking […]]]>

A frenetic scene is materializing four days a week at the Fairfax County Courthouse in Virginia as fans seek seats in the libel trial between Johnny Depp and his ex-wife Amber Heard.

The queue to enter the courthouse begins before sunrise. Throughout the day, people appear carrying signs, wearing fan merch and costumes, even walking with a pair of alpacas. Almost all of them are there for Depp.

“We just want to support our captain,” said Jack Baker, 20, who arrived dressed as a Pirates of the Caribbean extra on Monday to shoot footage for his YouTube channel. “If he goes down with the ship, we go down with him.”

Maryam Alam, 29, and Alina Alam, 29, had hoped to enter the courthouse, but when they showed up at 7 a.m. they were already too late. Both grew up watching Depp on screen – playing characters such as Edward Scissorhands, Captain Jack Sparrow, Willy Wonka – and were eager to see him in person.

“It’s the fulfillment of a childhood fantasy,” said Maryam Alam. “That’s why everyone is here.”

High-profile celebrity cases have drawn large audiences since Court TV began broadcasting from courtrooms in the 1990s. But Depp and Heard’s trial has become a case study in what happens when Complex claims are filtered through the lenses of stan culture and social media.

In addition to live coverage on TV, YouTube, and various news and entertainment websites, countless short clips edited for maximum virality have circulated on Instagram and TikTok — “fancams,” in the parlance from social media, with forensic analysis of Depp and Heard’s trial outfit. , and the exchanges in the courtrooms that have been called “WILD”.

Depp, 58, is suing Heard, 36, over an essay she published in The Washington Post in 2018 about sexual violence, in which she described herself as a “public figure representing domestic violence.” Although Depp was not named in the article, he argued that he was clearly referring to him, damaging his reputation and career. (Heard filed for divorce in 2016 and, shortly thereafter, a restraining order against Depp, which was granted.) In her testimony, Depp denied ever hitting Heard and maintained that she was the abuser. in their relationship. The jury is simultaneously considering a countersuit for libel from Heard against Depp.

Numerous accusations surfaced in 2020, during a defamation case brought by Depp against The Sun, a British newspaper which ran a headline calling him a “wife beater”. The judge ruled that the defendants had shown that what they posted was “substantially true”, and Depp lost the case.

Although the Virginia jury has been instructed to carefully weigh the evidence and not return a verdict until after testimony is complete (Heard has yet to take a position), and fan watchers have been advised not to comment. audibly or visibly to either party in the courtroom, the rest of the world is under no such obligation.

In a TikTok video captioned “AMBER HEARD CUGHT LYING AGAIN”, Ethan Trace (2.8 million subscribers) happily recounts how Heard’s lawyer told the court that the actress used a makeup palette to cover up the bruises Depp gave her during their marriage. The attorney held up a palette to reinforce her point, and while she didn’t name the brand, it was identifiable in the trial photos and video, and internet sleuths were quick to name the company, Milani Cosmetics.

Milani, the brand, then posted a TikTok video stating that the product featured by Heard’s attorney only became available after the couple split. (“Milani Cosmetics does not take a formal position on the trial, the evidence, or the future outcome of the case,” a spokesperson wrote in a statement.)

“Boom!” Trace says in the video. “Milani Cosmetics: We love you! Thanks for sharing!” The video has over 16 million views.

In an email, Trace said he felt Depp had been treated unfairly by the media. “How could anyone talk about evidence that could possibly prove a man’s innocence after he was branded an ‘abuser’ in the public eye?” he wrote.

On April 13, shortly after testifying began, Gawker noted that the TikTok hashtag #justiceforjohnnydepp had received 1.1 billion views. In two weeks, that number has more than quadrupled. As of this writing, #justiceforamberheard has 22 million views.

Heard’s supporters hope his testimony will change the dialogue surrounding the trial. “Instead of watching all these TikToks and stuff, I think people should actually follow the case,” 22-year-old Carmen Diamandis said.

“Stans will literally go to any lengths to defend anyone,” he said of Depp’s supporters, adding, “Amber Heard, she doesn’t have that fan base.”

Marianne Nafsu, 32, a true crime content creator from Detroit who has published about the case, said: “I can’t wait to hear her side when she goes to trial.” She added that “it is right to listen to both sides and see: where is all this coming from?”

Asked to comment on the fan response, Heard’s lawyers provided his friend Eve Barlow, a music journalist who tweeted in support of Heard.

“The social media landscape is shockingly brutal for Amber,” Barlow wrote in an email, adding that many of the comments on TikTok and Twitter reflect “misogynistic hatred.” Representatives for Depp did not respond to a request for comment.

Rachel Louise Snyder, author of “No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us,” said in an interview that Depp has certain advantages over Heard in the court of public opinion.

“People will do without the same critical eye they would give anyone else when it comes to someone who is truly a beloved figure,” she said. Snyder added that the case offers a potential counter-narrative to common misconceptions about abuse: who can perpetuate it and who can be victimized.

“We don’t see the victims as rich. We do not consider the victims as men. We don’t see abusers as women,” she said. “I’m not saying she’s an aggressor and he’s a victim. I’m just saying that we have the opportunity to examine our own myths and stereotypes around “Who is the victim and who is the aggressor?” (Violence affects 1 in 4 women, according to the National Domestic Violence Hotline, and 1 in 7 men.)

On TikTok, many Depp supporters posted a recording in which Heard said, “Tell the world, Johnny, tell them, ‘I, Johnny Depp, a man, am a victim of domestic violence too'” and continued: ” See how many people believe or side with you.

Scout Robert, 24, was taken aback by Heard’s words. “When she said that, she told the world that as a man you can’t be abused,” she said in an interview. Robert, who has over 40,000 followers on TikTok, has posted numerous videos on the platform, in which she called Heard a liar, an abuser and a hypocrite. Some have been viewed hundreds of thousands of times.

Robert said she felt the #MeToo “believe women” slogan had become overused. Instead, she said, people should “listen to women”, while recognizing “that men can also be victims of domestic violence”.

Snyder, likewise, thinks the Depp trial could spark more nuanced conversations about abuse and how it doesn’t always fit within clearly prescribed boundaries.

“Maybe he’s a victim; he may be an aggressor; maybe he’s a bit of both,” she said. “Same for her.”

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Biden calls for stopping making teachers the ‘target of culture wars’ https://seattlewto.org/biden-calls-for-stopping-making-teachers-the-target-of-culture-wars/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 14:15:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/biden-calls-for-stopping-making-teachers-the-target-of-culture-wars/ President Biden on Wednesday called on Americans to stop putting teachers in the middle of “culture wars” as various book bans gain momentum across the country and Democrats and Republicans disagree on the issue of whether parents should have more control over what their children learn in school. “American teachers have dedicated their lives to […]]]>

President Biden on Wednesday called on Americans to stop putting teachers in the middle of “culture wars” as various book bans gain momentum across the country and Democrats and Republicans disagree on the issue of whether parents should have more control over what their children learn in school.

“American teachers have dedicated their lives to teaching our children and raising them,” the president said at the annual National and State Teacher of the Year awards ceremony at the White House.

“We need to stop making it the target of culture wars. That’s where it happens.

During the event, Biden accused politicians of “trying to score political points” by pushing for certain books to be banned from schools.

“Even math books,” Biden said, referring to the Florida Department of Education’s recent decision to ban the teaching of 54 math textbooks because of what he called “problematic” material. “.

President Biden has called on Americans to stop putting teachers in the middle of “culture wars.”
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

“I mean, did you ever think – even you young teachers – did you ever think, when you were teaching, that you were worried about books being burned and books being banned, all because it doesn’t fit on someone’s political agenda?” asked the president.

As of March 31, more than a thousand books had been banned from various libraries and classrooms across the country, according to the nonprofit organization PEN America.

While many of these books deal with sexuality, racism, and LGBTQ+ issues, the list also includes well-known novels such as “The Kite Runner,” “To Kill a Mockingbird,” and “The Bell Jar.”

First Lady Jill Biden speaks during the 2022 National and State Teachers of the Year event in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, April 27, 2022.
First Lady Jill Biden speaks at the 2022 National and State Teachers of the Year event, April 27, 2022.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

The nonprofit found that at least 41% of banned books listed are related to directives from state officials or lawmakers to investigate or remove the books.

School boards and districts cite a variety of reasons when they ban books — either indicating excessive violence, racial insensitivity, or — in the case of Florida — the inclusion of critical race theory.

Earlier this month, Florida rejected 41% of math textbook publisher submissions because many included “references to critical race theory” or the inclusion of the common core.

President Joe Biden shakes hands with Kurt Russell, 2022 National Teacher of the Year
President Joe Biden shakes hands with 2022 National Teacher of the Year Kurt Russell.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh
President Joe Biden shakes hands with 2022 National Teacher of the Year Kurt Russell during the 2022
President Biden has accused politicians of “trying to score political points” by pushing for certain books to be banned from schools.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

“It seems that some editors have tried to apply a coat of paint to an old house built on common core foundations and indoctrinate concepts such as racial essentialism, especially, oddly, for elementary school students” said Florida Governor Ron DeSantis. statement at the time.

In January, a Tennessee school district banned Art Spiegelman’s book “Maus” — a Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel about the Holocaust — because of graphic scenes and profanity.

At the time, McMinn County School Board member Tony Allman defended the decision, saying “it shows people hanging, it shows them killing children.”

President Joe Biden presents Delaware's 2022 Teacher of the Year Jahsha Tabron, second from left, with a challenge coin following an event with National and State Teachers of the Year 2022 of the Council of Chief State School Officers in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, April 27, 2022.
President Biden presents Jahsha Tabron, Delaware’s 2022 Teacher of the Year, with a challenge coin following an event with the Council of State School Principals’ National and State Teachers of the Year 2022 .
AP Photo/Susan Walsh
Education Secretary Miguel Cardona shakes hands with 2022 National Teacher of the Year Kurt Russell
Education Secretary Miguel Cardona shakes hands with 2022 National Teacher of the Year Kurt Russell.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

“Why does the education system promote this stuff? It’s neither wise nor healthy,” Allman said.

That same month, a school board just outside of Seattle pulled “To Kill a Mockingbird” from its curriculum after various parents, students and teachers complained of racial insensitivity.

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How Italian culture inspired Starbucks to add lattes to its menu https://seattlewto.org/how-italian-culture-inspired-starbucks-to-add-lattes-to-its-menu/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 19:06:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/how-italian-culture-inspired-starbucks-to-add-lattes-to-its-menu/ Did you know that for the first 12 years of its life, Starbucks didn’t sell physical coffee cups? From 1971 to 1983, Starbucks sold strictly whole-bean coffee, tea, and spices, along with a line of household items like coffee makers, grinders, and teapots (via Starbucks Stories & News). Cappuccinos, lattes, and iced coffee, not to […]]]>

Did you know that for the first 12 years of its life, Starbucks didn’t sell physical coffee cups? From 1971 to 1983, Starbucks sold strictly whole-bean coffee, tea, and spices, along with a line of household items like coffee makers, grinders, and teapots (via Starbucks Stories & News). Cappuccinos, lattes, and iced coffee, not to mention Frappuccinos, weren’t available at that time. However, customers were able to preview the freshly brewed black coffee before buying the beans in bulk.

So what convinced Starbucks to change from a retail business to a cafe? In 1983, Howard Schultz, the Operations and Marketing Manager, took a trip to Milan where he was able to experience Italian café culture firsthand. To say Schultz was enchanted by what he experienced would be an understatement. He left Italy inspired and started thinking about how Starbucks could reflect that same magic. Thus, the idea of ​​Starbucks coffees was born. The first opened in Seattle with a caffè latte on the menu. Schultz then opened his own coffee line, but returned as CEO of Starbucks in 1987, according to his Starbucks bio page. And the rest, as they say, is coffee history.

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