Seattle education – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 07:44:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://seattlewto.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Seattle education – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ 32 32 Lawmakers approve bill to make genocide education mandatory https://seattlewto.org/lawmakers-approve-bill-to-make-genocide-education-mandatory/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 21:04:29 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/lawmakers-approve-bill-to-make-genocide-education-mandatory/ BOSTON (AP) – Middle school and high school students in Massachusetts will learn about the history of the genocide and human rights issues under a bill approved by state lawmakers on Wednesday. The bill requires colleges and high schools in the state to include education on the history of the genocide. The legislation comes as […]]]>

BOSTON (AP) – Middle school and high school students in Massachusetts will learn about the history of the genocide and human rights issues under a bill approved by state lawmakers on Wednesday.

The bill requires colleges and high schools in the state to include education on the history of the genocide. The legislation comes as cases of hate and anti-Semitism are on the rise across the country, with several incidents reported in Massachusetts over the past year, lawmakers said.

Republican Gov. Charlie Baker has 10 days to decide whether or not to sign the bill. Massachusetts does not currently require education about the Holocaust or other genocides as part of its school curriculum.


Lawmakers renewed pressure to make genocide history education mandatory earlier this year after a high school football coach was sacked over reports the team used a anti-Semitic language, including a mention of Auschwitz, in his field appeal.

The Massachusetts Senate last year approved a similar bill requiring genocide education before students graduate from high school, but it did not reach Baker’s office.

This bill would create a genocide education trust fund to support the development of educational materials and provide professional development training for educators.

The legislation would also require school districts to file annually a description of their lesson plans and programs for educating students about genocide with the Ministry of Elementary and Secondary Education.

According to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, up to 17 states require Holocaust education as part of their high school programs.

Lawmakers supporting the bill cite a 2020 Jewish Material Claims Conference investigation against Germany. The survey assessed knowledge about the Holocaust among millennials and Gen Z populations and found that 63% of those surveyed in the United States were unaware that six million Jews had been murdered during the Holocaust.

The survey also found that nearly half of those polled were unfamiliar with Nazi concentration camps like Auschwitz.

Democratic Senate Speaker Karen Spilka has said that if past crimes against humanity cannot be undone, society must learn from them.

“As the Jewish wife and daughter of a WWII veteran who liberated the Buchenwald concentration camp, I believe it is our responsibility to ensure that we educate our children about the many cases of genocide in through history so that it never repeats itself, ”Spilka said. in a written statement.

An external investigator discovered in June that the Duxbury High School football team that used anti-Semitic language in a game this season have been using similar language in training for about a decade.

The investigator was hired in March in response to revelations that the Duxbury High School team used the word ‘Auschwitz’ during an on-field call during a game. The team also used the words “rabbi” and “dreidel”.

In a summary of the report released at the time, Duxbury Schools Superintendent John Antonucci said the coaching staff were likely aware the team was using such language.


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Indian Education Act | South Seattle Emerald https://seattlewto.org/indian-education-act-south-seattle-emerald/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 17:30:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/indian-education-act-south-seattle-emerald/ by Patheresa Wells The Highline Public Schools Indigenous Education Program will host a Celebration of Indigenous Voices on Saturday, November 27, from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., highlighting and honoring the work of Indigenous land and water protectors and leaders of First Nations food sovereignty. The event will include screenings of two films, AWAKE: A […]]]>

by Patheresa Wells


The Highline Public Schools Indigenous Education Program will host a Celebration of Indigenous Voices on Saturday, November 27, from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., highlighting and honoring the work of Indigenous land and water protectors and leaders of First Nations food sovereignty. The event will include screenings of two films, AWAKE: A Standing Rock Dream and TO ASSEMBLE, as well as discussions on issues of importance to indigenous communities – including the sacred work of water and land protectors – and the sharing of Highline Indigenous Education.

The Highline Indigenous Education Program is a legacy program established in 1974 with the passage of the Indian Education Act. The program was started as a way to meet the culturally related needs of Native American and Alaska Native students. Since its inception, the program has had its own history of growth, but in 2013 it was relaunched with, as program manager Sara Ortiz puts it, a desire to be “visionary in our approach to Indigenous or Indian education. … to include as many artists, as many custodians of culture, academics, alumni, media creators, [and] language teachers [as possible]. “

continue reading Highline Indigenous Voices Celebration features art, education and stories


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There is another crisis in education; Can India benefit from this? https://seattlewto.org/there-is-another-crisis-in-education-can-india-benefit-from-this/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 07:23:25 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/there-is-another-crisis-in-education-can-india-benefit-from-this/ In a world where excellent content is often available on the internet and machine translation will soon make content available in the native language, the preponderance of English, as well as the Anglosphere model of universities, can both be under siege. There have long been concerns about a few issues related to education in India: […]]]>

In a world where excellent content is often available on the internet and machine translation will soon make content available in the native language, the preponderance of English, as well as the Anglosphere model of universities, can both be under siege.

There have long been concerns about a few issues related to education in India: The poor quality of the humanities curriculum and the fear that English will become an albatross rather than a catalyst. On average, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) is assumed to be doing well in the country, and this is a source of pride.

Hence, it was surprising to see the results of the Kerala State Entrance Exams and the adoption of Engineering. According to KEAM statistics, less than 10 students across Kerala have opted for civil engineering. But more than 5,000 rushed into IT and more than 2,500 into electronics. There were relatively few outlets for Mechanical, Electrical (Power) and so on: only in the hundreds each (India time, November 12, 2021, “2 engg branches get less than 10 applicants each”).

It is, one might say, the free market at work, as there are more job opportunities nowadays for computer science graduates. However, this is an extremely skewed result: doesn’t India as a country need a large number of civil engineers to help build infrastructure, which is a priority: roads, railways, ports, power stations, bridges, etc.

You could ask the same question about other traditional branches of engineering. India clearly needs engineers in mechanical, chemical, aerospace and electrical engineering. The country already lacks technical skills in some areas. For example, where are the materials scientists (nanotechnology is a hot multidisciplinary field)?

It is not clear whether Kerala’s results are replicated across the country, but it is evident that an entire generation of engineers is “missing”. One problem is that a standard career path for engineers is to go straight to business school and come out as an investment banker, or management consultant, or other positions where their engineering background is. is irrelevant, and the nation’s subsidy (maybe Rs 50 lakh) in them is wasted.

It is true that engineering is cyclical, and disciplines have their ups and downs. One example is aerospace engineering in the United States: after NASA sharply reduced its investment in space exploration, this discipline took a hit; some engineers lost their jobs and in Seattle (Boeing territory) were found driving taxis for a living.

But computers and electronics have retained their appeal. When I was a student, electronics were in demand; later, computing took its place. The world runs on semiconductor chips and software; therefore, at first glance, Indian students who choose them should give India a competitive advantage.

But the reality is different: India is a non-present in electronic capacity; yes, there are design skills for semiconductors, but without a single noteworthy manufacturing facility, critical manufacturing capability is lacking; multinationals that now use Indian captive centers for chip design can easily move to other countries, such as Eastern Europe, either for geopolitical reasons or for cost reasons. There is no grip with the design positions.

On the software side, sad to say, there has been virtually no intellectual property generated in India for Indian companies; the vast majority of effort has been devoted to software services, not products. That may change with the emergence of a new generation of startups, especially those that rely on the JAM trinity and the availability of inexpensive bandwidth. But the point is, software service jobs have created no long-term value for the economy.

Thus, it should be noted that unlike Silicon Valley, where the first pioneers left a solid base for new innovations, the IT majors in India have practically no R&D, despite the wealth of many employees and shareholders. In this context, it should be noted that Silicon Valley is now losing its preeminence as digital nomads settle elsewhere: Miami, Austin, Singapore, etc. Competitive advantage can be evanescent.

Is there anything India can offer its STEM graduates that creates a long-term incentive for them to stay? Otherwise, they will move to other areas: for example, the demand for business courses has exploded. Presumably, these will lead to jobs in the financial sector.

And it comes at a time when the “awakened” mentality, created and nurtured by American academics, is also coming to India, where it will find fertile ground, as the dominant narrative in Indian academia is even further to the left. I have personally learned to be silent in cafeteria conversations over lunch for fear of being lynched.

It is a problem even in Indian business schools. Worse yet, even the most reputable universities in the humanities and social sciences seem more capable of producing thoughtless consumers of propaganda than of producing world-class research. It is a huge failure of the system.

The effect of the simple introduction of a few human sciences courses in the IITs has been particularly negative. The ghost of Trofim Lysenko hangs over them. India’s NEP 2020 is a misguided effort to transform India’s monolithic STEM schools into what are called “universities” in the West. There is a good chance that they will turn into citadels of “awakened” instead.

Wokeness has turned American universities into strongholds of intolerance, targeted attacks on certain groups, group thinking, safe spaces and general stultification. It used to be that an undergraduate degree from the United States was worth anything, but not anymore: for the money they ask, American universities offer little value.

It is as a revolt against this that Niall Ferguson, historian (and incidentally an apologist for imperialism), wrote about the new University of Austin that he is helping to co-found. The objective is to bring back to the human sciences their original objective, supposedly the pursuit of truth.

It sounds good, but there could be greater forces at play. The traditional university may be on the way out. Going back to the example of Kerala, a number of departments can close for lack of students; some engineering schools have already closed. It’s happened in business schools before. The age of on-campus internships may be over.

In a world where excellent content is available to everyone everywhere, often for free, on the Internet, and where I hope machine translation will soon make content available in the native language (in real time), the preponderance of English , as well as the Anglosphere model of universities, can both be under siege.

Can India propose an alternative model and take a leapfrog? As Dharampal’s work shows, traditional knowledge systems formed well-balanced citizens long ago.

The writer has been a conservative columnist for over 25 years. Its academic interest is innovation. The opinions expressed are personal.


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Beshear proposes merger of education and labor firms https://seattlewto.org/beshear-proposes-merger-of-education-and-labor-firms/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 22:43:06 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/beshear-proposes-merger-of-education-and-labor-firms/ FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) – Gov. Andy Beshear announced Thursday that his administration is moving forward with a merger of Kentucky’s education and labor cabinets. The Democratic governor said the current arrangement makes it difficult to remain competitive for certain federal grants and also creates challenges for meeting certain federal standards. Beshear also said that Kentucky’s […]]]>

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) – Gov. Andy Beshear announced Thursday that his administration is moving forward with a merger of Kentucky’s education and labor cabinets.

The Democratic governor said the current arrangement makes it difficult to remain competitive for certain federal grants and also creates challenges for meeting certain federal standards.

Beshear also said that Kentucky’s pandemic unemployment insurance system “must be part of a bigger, more robust cabinet” and insisted the merger would give the state “a chance to cross-training and more resilience, ”if Kentucky were to deal with something like the coronavirus pandemic in the future.

Like other states, Kentucky has been inundated with a record number of jobless claims caused by the coronavirus. Many state residents waited months for unemployment claims to be processed.

The merger requires legislative approval from the state’s General Assembly, where Republicans hold veto-proof qualified majorities in both chambers.


“I think lawmakers should give this governor and others the tools they ultimately need to deal with the situations they face,” Beshear said. “Certainly, asking for fewer cabinets rather than more should be part of the government philosophy of the majority, but we will speak with them.”


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Native American Education in Spokane Public Schools: “There is a Lack of Confidence” https://seattlewto.org/native-american-education-in-spokane-public-schools-there-is-a-lack-of-confidence/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 02:51:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/native-american-education-in-spokane-public-schools-there-is-a-lack-of-confidence/ During a recent class at Grant Elementary School, several Native American students held up identifying signs that reinforced a point the general population rarely understood. None of the signs say “Native American”. Instead, they identified the children as members of the Spokane, Colville, Assiniboine, and other tribes. For Tamika LaMere, Director of the Indigenous Education […]]]>

During a recent class at Grant Elementary School, several Native American students held up identifying signs that reinforced a point the general population rarely understood.

None of the signs say “Native American”. Instead, they identified the children as members of the Spokane, Colville, Assiniboine, and other tribes.

For Tamika LaMere, Director of the Indigenous Education Program at Spokane Public Schools, it was a great time to learn for the students and their guests.

“It’s one of the goals of our program, which we educate internally and externally, and don’t perpetuate stereotypes,” said LeMere.

“We’re talking about the equity and diversity that reside in our people as distinct tribal nations: our language, our style of dress, the food we eat – all of the things that make us feel distinct – so that we don’t let’s not perpetuate these stereotypes. “

Of the 547 federally recognized tribes, 130 are represented by nearly 2,000 students in Spokane public schools.

According to statistics collected by the state’s superintendent of public education, Native American students need help, inside and outside the classroom. To this end, LaMere and his assistants focus on the latter, providing cultural enrichment through traditional activities such as drumming, singing and cooking.

Raised in Great Falls, MT, LaMere is a member of the Little Shell Chippewas, who like so many tribes no longer own their land.

While it is important to recognize that the school district and town are on the unceded land of the Spokane tribe, she also understands the needs of urban Native Americans “without knowing who they are as native people.”

“Some kids, you ask them which tribe they’re from and they won’t know,” LaMere said.

At the same time, Native American students from Spokane and beyond are struggling inside and outside the classroom.

As of spring 2020, about 78% of Native Americans and Alaska Natives in the district graduated on time, compared to 89% of the overall population.

That same year, 59% of Native American ninth graders passed all of their classes, compared to 74% of all students. One in eight dropped out before graduating from high school.

These numbers are better than national averages and comparable to other districts in the state – with one glaring exception: Spokane has one of the lowest kindergarten readiness rates in the state at 32%; yet, for Native American children, it is only 18%.

Some of these same children have grandparents who were forced into boarding schools who tried to take away their cultural identity.

“There is a lack of confidence,” said LaMere, a former counselor at Glover Middle School who has been leading the Indigenous education program since the summer of 2020.

That’s the challenge: to build confidence among Native American families that the education system will help them assimilate knowledge and experiences that will help them succeed without being assimilated themselves.

Focusing on the areas most in need, Native Education staff work primarily in five elementary schools: Stevens, Grant, Logan, Regal, and Bemiss.

The work includes intervening with students who have behavioral and social difficulties – “to keep them engaged, to have someone to turn to,” LaMere said.

This task has been complicated by the COVID-19 pandemic, as many families have withdrawn to their homes; LaMere and her staff responded with home visits.

While serving as a liaison with teachers and staff, the program also attempts to provide ongoing support to Native American students.

In the tradition of the signs held by the students of LaMère, other students receive an education.

In March 2018, the legislature passed Senate Bill 5028, which requires teacher preparation programs to integrate the “From Time immemorial” tribal sovereignty curriculum into existing Pacific Northwest history and government requirements.

For non-Indigenous students, curriculum changes are intended to increase awareness and compassion. For Indigenous students, it can teach strength and resilience, foster the development of a positive identity, and help maintain tribal sovereignty.

“To help them feel visible,” LaMere said.


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UNR to Offer Nevada’s First Online Marijuana Education Program https://seattlewto.org/unr-to-offer-nevadas-first-online-marijuana-education-program/ Sun, 07 Nov 2021 15:39:16 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/unr-to-offer-nevadas-first-online-marijuana-education-program/ RENO, Nevada (AP) – The extended study program at the University of Nevada, Reno launches the first online courses in the state to obtain uncredited certificates in cannabis education ranging from business to horticulture and medicine to help meet the demand for jobs in a field that the sponsors say “is growing like gangbusters.” Each […]]]>

RENO, Nevada (AP) – The extended study program at the University of Nevada, Reno launches the first online courses in the state to obtain uncredited certificates in cannabis education ranging from business to horticulture and medicine to help meet the demand for jobs in a field that the sponsors say “is growing like gangbusters.”

Each certificate program consists of three eight-week online courses offered by Green Flower, a professional cannabis training company. The four programs cover the business of the marijuana industry; agriculture and horticulture; law and policy; and health care and medicine.

“It’s a new era,” said Jodi Herzik, acting vice-president for comprehensive studies.


“The industry is changing,” she told the Reno Gazette Journal. “You can’t just have old potheads over the counter, you have to have educated professionals.”

Legal cannabis sales exceeded $ 1 billion in the fiscal year ended Sept. 30 in Nevada, where about 10,000 people work in the industry, the Nevada Dispensary Association reported.

“We’ve been careful to stress that this is strictly education about the industry because there is a need,” Herzik said.

“With the impact of COVID-19 displaced and people looking for new career paths, we thought it might be a good time to try this program,” she said. “Jobs in this area are growing like gangbusters. These are also high paying jobs.

Legal cannabis supports 321,000 full-time jobs nationwide, growing faster than any other industry in the country, according to the Leafly 2021 employment report.

“Such growth has created a large and growing job market, and a tremendous opportunity for the people of Nevada to find rewarding careers,” said Daniel Kalef, vice president of higher education for Green Flower.

Marijuana is still illegal federally, and that includes direct research, consumption, and all other direct use. A majority of states, however, have legalized marijuana to some extent.

Nevada was the third state to approve medical cannabis with the passage of the Nevada Medical Marijuana Act in 1998. Nevada residents voted to legalize adult recreational cannabis in 2016.

Herzik said the university had not heavily promoted the program in order to have a smooth launch this month, allowing the school to ensure that it is well suited and does not need no adjustment.

About 30 to 40 potential students have expressed interest so far, including many from the Las Vegas area and a few other parts of the country, she said.

The first online course session begins on November 15th.

The cost is $ 2,950 per certificate, but the university is offering a special one-time discount of $ 500 to students who register for the November launch. Payment plans are available.

Students will develop a portfolio of case studies and projects that can be used to demonstrate industry-specific cannabis knowledge, Herzik said. Upon successful completion of the program, students will be awarded a certificate of completion from UNR.

Classes start on six start dates per year and are scheduled to accommodate working professionals, she said.

Registrations are open at https://cannabiseducation.unr.edu.


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Evers veto education bill intended to help ‘at risk’ readers https://seattlewto.org/evers-veto-education-bill-intended-to-help-at-risk-readers/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 21:09:59 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/evers-veto-education-bill-intended-to-help-at-risk-readers/ MADISON, Wis. (AP) – Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers on Friday vetoed a plan that would have overhauled how elementary schools operate with young children who have trouble reading, saying he needs more money to support the changes. The bill would have tripled the number of literacy tests young students take in school and would require […]]]>

MADISON, Wis. (AP) – Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers on Friday vetoed a plan that would have overhauled how elementary schools operate with young children who have trouble reading, saying he needs more money to support the changes.

The bill would have tripled the number of literacy tests young students take in school and would require educators to create a personalized reading plan for each student identified as an “at risk” reader. Supporters say the move would improve reading skills that have been poorly graded for decades.

Evers, the former state superintendent and former educator, said in his veto message that the bill does not include the funds necessary to achieve the goals of the bill, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported.


“I oppose the fundamental overhaul of literacy education and intervention in Wisconsin without evidence that statewide mandatory testing is the best approach for our students, and without provide the necessary funding for implementation, ”the governor wrote.

The bill’s sponsors Senator Kathy Bernier and Rep. Joel Kitchens, both Republicans, said in a letter that while the bill does not correct all reading flaws, it is ” an important first step that will make a significant difference “.

The Administration Department said an estimate of the cost of the bill was undetermined, but said it would likely lead to increased costs for school districts and charter schools due to the increased frequency of testing and staff time to prepare improvement plans and educate parents. .


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Special Education PTSA | South Seattle Emerald https://seattlewto.org/special-education-ptsa-south-seattle-emerald/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 18:15:51 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/special-education-ptsa-south-seattle-emerald/ by Ari Robin McKenna A mix of more than a hundred teachers, parents and students showed up at the SoDo district headquarters on Wednesday, October 27 for a rally on a dark and drizzly evening. A number of speeches were made under the partially covered colonnade in front of a red wall. eyeing an estimated […]]]>

by Ari Robin McKenna


A mix of more than a hundred teachers, parents and students showed up at the SoDo district headquarters on Wednesday, October 27 for a rally on a dark and drizzly evening. A number of speeches were made under the partially covered colonnade in front of a red wall. eyeing an estimated gap of $ 78 million for the 2022-2023 school year.

The rally was organized by Seattle Education Association (SEA) in collaboration with the Special Education PTSA (SEPTSA). The protest was in response to news that there would be 50 schools affected by special education staff adjustments – which SEPTSA reported on their Blog. With the slogan “Needs before numbers”, speakers at the rally criticized the impact of these movements in specific schools and the general lack of involvement of parents and teachers in staffing decisions. Participants also questioned whether a disproportionate amount of the 3,440 students left district since 2019 were receiving appropriate special education services.

Tess Bath, Special Education Teacher Assistant in Highland Park’s Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Program, addressed the crowd warmly. “It’s really nice to be here with all of you. We cried a lot and it’s really soothing to share some space. “The 2021-2022 school year, in the wake of two years disrupted by COVID, was brutal on educators, and Bath read a letter she sent to the district about how staff changes can be disruptive to her work. “SEL is built on consistent and trusting relationships. Breaking them would change the very foundation of our program and our ability to do our work and serve our students… They deserve to have enough support to achieve their IEP. [Individual Education Program] objectives, access their LRE [Least Restrictive Environment], and be considered a priority by their school district.

The disruption that occurs when only one educator has to leave their school and the relationships they have forged is incalculable. But given the context of a pandemic, a massive budget deficit, and a special education system that favors white students, some have expressed doubts about the timing of this rally, and the information that catalyzed it.

continue reading Questions about fairness in the south of the country after the protest highlighted movements of personnel for special education


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Christopher Rufo says heated education debate will go far beyond Virginia https://seattlewto.org/christopher-rufo-says-heated-education-debate-will-go-far-beyond-virginia/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 23:09:25 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/christopher-rufo-says-heated-education-debate-will-go-far-beyond-virginia/ Principal investigator of the Manhattan Institute Christophe Rufo, who has become a national figure for shedding light on the critical ideology of racial theory that has emerged in schools and institutions across the country, is confident that the heated debate on education will go far beyond the race for governor of Virginia. When asked if […]]]>

Principal investigator of the Manhattan Institute Christophe Rufo, who has become a national figure for shedding light on the critical ideology of racial theory that has emerged in schools and institutions across the country, is confident that the heated debate on education will go far beyond the race for governor of Virginia.

When asked if the issue of education would be a factor in the 2022 midterm elections, Rufo replied “without a doubt.”

CHRISTOPHER RUFO: AT&T RACIAL REHABILITATION PROMOTES THE IDEA THAT “RACISM IS ONLY A WHITE CHARACTER”

“This is a real problem and it has sparked a real popular revolt in every state across the country,” Rufo told Fox News Digital in an interview on Tuesday, hours before the polls closed in Virginia. “You have places in the suburbs of New York, the suburbs of Seattle, the suburbs of San Francisco and even in the urban school districts of the bluest cities in America where parents say, ‘No, we don’t want to teach. collective guilt, we don’t. We don’t want to teach racial essentialism, we don’t want to demolish standards and academic merit, we don’t want to eliminate gifted programs, we don’t want to overwhelm the pursuit of educational excellence in this truly confrontational and nihilistic racial orthodoxy. ”

Christopher F. Rufo is a senior researcher at the Manhattan Institute and editor of the City Journal. Follow him on Twitter at @realchrisrufo and sign up for his newsletter.
(Christophe F. Rufo)

Rufo, who spoke at the National Conservatism Conference in Orlando on Monday, highlighted the “change” against the CRT, where not only conservative grassroots voters are mobilizing locally, but also among “three-quarters of voters. independent “and that members of minority groups at all levels” all oppose it by large margins “.

“And so you have a bipartisan, multiracial coalition of new people who have addressed this issue with incredible power. And what we are seeing is really the mobilization of a new interest group, the parents of the schools. public, and we should absolutely fight for these people, “Rufo said.” These are American families. These are the people who hold our country together. These are the people who are raising the next generation. And they categorically reject critical race theory. So we need to provide them with a political voice and a political outlet for them not only to voice grievances, which is important, but to implement important reforms. “

CHRISTOPHER RUFO: NOW TEAM BIDEN WANTS TO FREE FBI AGAINST PARENTS WHO OPPOSE CRITICAL THEORY OF RACE

The journalist-turned-activist said he “didn’t expect” the education debate to dominate running in Virginia, but that was “not surprising” since Loudoun and Fairfax counties had been a “focal point” of the issue in the past. year.

“Parents and activists in these suburban neighborhoods have discovered the most disgusting and blatant behavior… and destructive of these school boards which should absolutely be removed from their posts. And yet they cling to their bureaucratic power, which I think has created a focal point for this conflict, ”Rufo told Fox News. “And the Youngkin campaign was smart enough, sophisticated enough to translate that into statewide political language that has seen astonishing and inspiring change.”

Parents and community members attend Loudoun County School Board meeting, just 40 minutes from Fairfax

Parents and community members attend Loudoun County School Board meeting, just 40 minutes from Fairfax
(REUTERS / Evelyn Hockstein)

When asked where he thought the next Loudoun County would be, Rufo cited the “formidable revolt” in Westchester County in New York City as well as the “brewing” movements in New York, Seattle and San Francisco, “not places you would expect,” adding that he had heard from concerned parents living in these liberal cities.

CHRIS RUFO BROUGHT OUT JOY REID’S ‘LANGUAGE GAMES’ AFTER LITTLE GOT A WORD DURING A HEATED CRT DEBATE

“It’s not the caricature you saw in The New York Times of rural voters dragging their fingers and expressing white grievances, you know, their white rage and white frailty. In fact, we didn’t. not seen much of that at all. “Rufo said. “What we really saw was a multiracial coalition in Blue Cities and Blue States driving this change. And I think that’s what terrified my opponents because they realize that they absolutely lose control of the narrative. And they ‘lose their critical base of support, which is rapidly growing, is diversifying into the blue suburbs, especially among women who are quite righteous – and viscerally opposed to what. they see these institutions. ”

In reaction to Merrick Garland doubling down on his memo monitoring alleged threats by parents to school boards across the country, even after the National School Board Association canceled his letter to the Department of Justice and even apologized for suggesting that the outraged parents were “domestic terrorists,” Rufo said. the attorney general, “good luck.”

Attorney General Merrick Garland testifies before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing reviewing the Department of Justice on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, October 27, 2021 (Tasos Katopodis / Pool via AP)

Attorney General Merrick Garland testifies before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing reviewing the Department of Justice on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, October 27, 2021 (Tasos Katopodis / Pool via AP)
(Tasos Katopodis / Pool via AP)

“This is an absolute parody of a policy. Using the power of the FBI to intimidate parents at local school board meetings is not something I expected. I think basically it is. is shameful. But then on pure politics, I mean, you ‘you now create a conflict or you create a contradiction between the public school mothers and the FBI. “

“Merrick Garland might be the FBI is a nicer character and he might be right, but I suspect anyone with a barely functioning brain would understand that if this is the battle line drawn by the administration , we are on the side of the work, the middle class, a daily multiracial coalition of mothers who just want a good education for their children. They are rejected by public schools. And they will not let the FBI bully them because they care more about their children than they fear the federal repressive apparatus, ”Rufo added.

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Rufo said the “next step in this movement” would be underway in the coming months with the release of a “platform” that allows “every school district, every school board, every state legislature, can translate this popular energy into concrete political reforms. “


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Louisiana higher education executive studying law https://seattlewto.org/louisiana-higher-education-executive-studying-law/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 17:46:33 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/louisiana-higher-education-executive-studying-law/ BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (AP) – The leader of Louisiana’s largest university system has a new hobby during his off hours, pursuing a law degree. The president of the University of Louisiana system, Jim Henderson, attends evening law classes at the Southern University Law Center in Baton Rouge and has reached his second year in the […]]]>

BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (AP) – The leader of Louisiana’s largest university system has a new hobby during his off hours, pursuing a law degree.

The president of the University of Louisiana system, Jim Henderson, attends evening law classes at the Southern University Law Center in Baton Rouge and has reached his second year in the program. He’s taking 11 credit hours this semester – all on Zoom – from his kitchen table. Classes are Tuesday and Thursday evenings and a few hours on Saturdays.

“This is a personal pursuit, not a professional one,” Henderson told The Acadiana Advocate.


The head of the nine-campus university system with more than 90,000 students hopes to complete his part-time law program in three or four years.

“I keep my other obligations in mind,” said Henderson. “That’s the beauty of the part-time program and how Southern put it together.”

Not that it wasn’t a challenge.

Henderson had to drop out of a class in the fall of 2020 when Hurricanes Laura and Delta wreaked havoc on many campuses in his system, with the worst damage at McNeese State University in Lake Charles.

Law Center Chancellor John Pierre said Southern welcomes students from busy backgrounds, such as former Governor Mike Foster, who attended law school during his tenure.

“Evening law students balance work, family and everything in between,” Pierre said. “But (Henderson) does it successfully. In the spring of 2021, it was off to a good start then COVID (variant) hits. We had to make some schedule adjustments, get it out of its normal cycle. We made him spend the summer. He is fine, very well.

Henderson, who ran the UL system for five years, began his law school journey with the encouragement of two women: Ashley Mitchell-Carter, alumnus of the Southern University Law Center and former director of government affairs for the UL system. , and 28-year-old Henderson’s wife, Tonia.

Mitchell-Carter was “the impetus” to get it started, he told the newspaper. Henderson said he would challenge Mitchell-Carter in conversations about legal issues. In turn, she encouraged him to pursue legal studies and told Pierre that she thought Henderson might be interested.

The young lawyer passed away suddenly on a vacation weekend in 2019. When Henderson consoled his mother, she told him, “She really wanted you to study law.” He later mentioned his desire to go to law school to his wife, who replied, “Why don’t you do it? That was all the encouragement he needed.

At present, Henderson does not consider himself a career in the practice of law.

“It’s not the driver,” he said. “It’s about the process. I am inclined to read – a lot – and it helps me in my current job. He develops a critical mind. It made me more effective as a leader.

But he said providing pro bono work for people who can’t afford a lawyer might one day be a possibility.


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