Seattle education – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 01:39:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://seattlewto.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Seattle education – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ 32 32 The first Seattle AIDS Walk raises $335,000 for AIDS treatment and education on September 27, 1987. https://seattlewto.org/the-first-seattle-aids-walk-raises-335000-for-aids-treatment-and-education-on-september-27-1987/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 01:39:04 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/the-first-seattle-aids-walk-raises-335000-for-aids-treatment-and-education-on-september-27-1987/ On September 27, 1987, more than 2,000 people walk 10 km in Seattle to raise funds for AIDS treatment and research. From Memorial Stadium, walkers descend Broad Street to Myrtle Edwards Park, loop through the park, and continue south on Alaskan Way to Spring Street. They return along Western Avenue to the Seattle Center […]]]>

On September 27, 1987, more than 2,000 people walk 10 km in Seattle to raise funds for AIDS treatment and research. From Memorial Stadium, walkers descend Broad Street to Myrtle Edwards Park, loop through the park, and continue south on Alaskan Way to Spring Street. They return along Western Avenue to the Seattle Center for a free concert by local musical groups. “This is not a moral issue, but the most important health issue in the history of the world,” U.S. Representative Mike Lowry told the crowd about the growing AIDS epidemic. “Today we’re going to vote with our feet for the money the feds should provide. And we’ll keep voting until we get the money” (“AIDS Walkathon…”). The event raises over $335,000. Future AIDS Walks, held annually in September, will raise up to $1.5 million.

Walk for a cause

By the dawn of 1987, 168 people in King County had died of AIDS, and hundreds more had been diagnosed with HIV or were living with full-blown AIDS. When the city’s LGBTQ community gathered at Volunteer Park in June for the usually celebratory national celebration of Gay and Lesbian Pride, “amid the flamboyance there was the sobering reminder of the AIDS virus that brought drastic changes to gay lifestyles.Unable to walk, several people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome rode floats in the parade to raise awareness of the need for more federal research dollars and more support for those coping with the disease” (“Gay, Lesbian Pride Events…”) The following month in San Francisco, an estimated crowd of 5,000 people took part in AIDS Walk San Francisco, a 10-kilometer walk through across Golden Gate Park. Each participant was supported by sponsors who agreed to contribute $1 to $100 for every kilometer walked. The event raised more than $500,000.

Using the plan established in San Francisco, Boston and four other US cities, the Northwest AIDS Foundation announced in August that it would hold a similar walkathon in Seattle – billed as From All Walks of Life – “as a demonstration of the growing resolve of the public to curb the spread of AIDS.Proceeds here will be allocated to the foundation, Pike Place Market, Country Doctor Clinics and other agencies involved in helping AIDS patients and education programs. .. The Seattle walkathon is also significant, a foundation spokesperson said, because it receives co-sponsorship from such heavyweights as Pacific Northwest Bell, Seafirst and Washington Mutal Banks, Immunex, Northern Life Insurance. and others” (“Seattle Fund-Raiser…”).

Held under sunny skies on September 27, 1987, From All Walks of Life attracted over 2,000 attendees. The rally began at Memorial Stadium at 9 a.m. for pre-walk festivities that included music, guest speakers and a mass on-field aerobics class to warm up the marchers. Many wore costumes, including six walkers who took part in a long monorail and another dressed as the Space Needle.

The opening ceremony included remarks from Seattle Mayor Charles Royer, U.S. Representatives Mike Lowry and John Miller, Pacific Northwest Bell CEO Andy Smith, and several people with AIDS. Miller said it was “impossible to know too much about AIDS. The danger is in knowing too little” (“AIDS Walkathon…”). Smith received a standing ovation, as did Lowry, who denounced President Ronald Reagan’s characterization of AIDS as a moral issue. “It’s not a moral issue,” Lowry said, “but the most important health issue in the history of the world” (“AIDS Walkathon…”). Organizers dedicated the event to AIDS patient and activist Michael Otto, who had spent the previous four days undergoing treatment at a Swedish hospital and was discharged from hospital an hour before the walkathon. Otto, 33, managed to walk part of the route in his weakened condition and hiked the rest in a van. He died three months later, one of more than 100 King County residents to succumb to AIDS in 1987.

After returning to Memorial Stadium, attendees were treated to a free three-hour concert featuring Annie Rose and the Thrillers, the Total Experience Choir, the Caribbean Super Stars Steel Band and several other musical acts, as well as a performance of the Seattle chapter. of the Tacky Tourists Club, a satirical theater troupe. By all accounts, the event was a resounding success. According to the final tally announced at the end of October, the 2,000 walkers were supported by contributions from 26,000 people who gave more than $335,000. In December, walkathon organizer Patricia Benavidez received a Humanitarian Award from the Seattle Chapter of the United Nations Association for her efforts.

A lasting legacy

Building on the success of its first AIDS Walk, the Northwest AIDS Foundation made it an annual event, still held each year in September. “Initially, the cost of mounting the march took a third of NWAF funds, a huge risk for a young organization. The risk paid off. Each September, business and political leaders joined media personalities and walking teams from the many communities affected by AIDS The fifth annual walk, the event drew 13,000 affected people to the streets and raised $1.2 million for 30 organizations providing AIDS education and services In addition to the highly visible Walk, other local fundraisers have provided much-needed funds for AIDS services, including Jars in Bars, the Bunny Brigade, and the perennial and popular events of the Tacky Tourist Club” (“A story…”).

The AIDS Walk reached its peak in 1991 when it raised $1.5 million, after which donations gradually dwindled in subsequent years as the medical community advanced treatments for HIV and AIDS. AIDS. Nonetheless, as of 2022, the AIDS Walk has remained a major fundraiser for the Lifelong AIDS Alliance, which formed in 2001 (when the Northwest AIDS Foundation merged with the Chicken Soup Brigade), and a rally important in remembering the more than 40 million people around the world who have lost their lives to the disease.

After Washington Governor Jay Inslee announced an “End AIDS Washington” campaign in December 2014, Lifelong renamed the event End AIDS Walk Seattle. The 30th annual walk was held in September 2016 at Volunteer Park and raised approximately $250,000. When the COVID-19 pandemic interrupted large in-person gatherings, the 2020 and 2021 marches were held virtually. In May 2021, Lifelong collaborated with similar agencies in San Francisco, New Orleans, Milwaukee and Austin, Texas to stage AIDS Walk: Live at Home, a TV and streaming show featuring a range of musicians , actors, authors and activists. “In Washington State and across the country, we continue to see Black, Latino, and Indigenous communities disproportionately impacted by new HIV cases,” said Claire Neal, CEO of Lifelong. “We are thrilled to work hand-in-hand with like-minded organizations across the country by collaborating on AIDS Walk: Live at Home” (“Seattle AIDS Walk Joins…”).



Sources:

“A History of HIV/AIDS,” AIDS Memorial Pathway website accessed September 29, 2022 (https://theamp.org/history/); Kaylee Osowski, “Seattle’s AIDS Walk Reaches 30 Years With Health for the Living and Hope for a Cure,” September 20, 2016, Capitol Hill Seattle blog accessed September 29, 2022 (https://www.capitolhillseattle.com/2016/09/ seattle-aids-walk-reachs-30-years-with-health-for-the-living-and-hope-for-a-cure/); Don Tewkesbury, “AIDS Walk Raises $250,000,” Seattle Post Intelligence, September 28, 1987, p. A-1; Mary Barouh, “Gay, Lesbian Pride events attract 12,000 people”, Seattle weather, June 29, 1987, p. B-1; “Seattle Fund-Raiser — Pledge Walk will boost AIDS research”, Same., August 24, 1987, p. AT 12 ; Richard Seven, “AIDS fighters come from all walks of life”, Same., September 28, 1987, p. C-3; “Seattle AIDS Walk Joins AIDS Walks Across America for ‘AIDS Walk: Live at Home’ May 16,” May 6, 2021, Lifelong website accessed September 20, 2022 (https://www.lifelong.org/blog-library/2021 /5/6/seattle-aids-walk-join-aids-walks-across-america-for-aids-walk-live-at-home-a-blockbuster-television-and-streaming-event-may-16).









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Ana Mari Cauce on the promotion of interdisciplinarity https://seattlewto.org/ana-mari-cauce-on-the-promotion-of-interdisciplinarity/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 23:12:34 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/ana-mari-cauce-on-the-promotion-of-interdisciplinarity/ As the head of one of America’s top five research universities – and one where she has worked her entire career – Ana Mari Cauce knows a lot about academic success. The University of Washington (UW) is world-class in many fields, including medicine, engineering, law, and business. But she strongly believes that to get the […]]]>

As the head of one of America’s top five research universities – and one where she has worked her entire career – Ana Mari Cauce knows a lot about academic success.

The University of Washington (UW) is world-class in many fields, including medicine, engineering, law, and business. But she strongly believes that to get the most out of the resources and talents she brings together as president, you have to help these experts cross individual or disciplinary boundaries.

One of UW’s best-known scholars was Ben Hall, the late genetics professor who co-created a hepatitis B vaccine. As a biologist in the 1970s, he studied yeast to understand how genes use RNA to replicate. And, as Cauce explains, he achieved his hepatitis breakthrough by working with UW colleagues from different scientific backgrounds in the joint pursuit of medical progress.

Creating a truly interdisciplinary environment, however, is never just a matter of a leader recognizing that this is a good design approach, as many universities talk about breaking down subject silos. Getting there is another matter: faculty can be set in their ways, and institutions often struggle to measure results outside of the tried and tested tradition of departmental evaluation.

However, Cauce says the paradigm-breaking moment of Covid showed him how much progress can be made by bypassing traditions and backward bureaucracies when circumstances demand urgent action.

Yet despite the astonishing success of science and medicine in the fight against the pandemic, she feels that the general public does not really understand how much credit researchers deserve for laying the groundwork and being at the height. “To date, I think we haven’t told enough of the story of the decades of basic research that allowed us to do this,” she says.

The traditional fields of biomedical science, for all their contributions, have not alone prevented millions of Covid deaths; the incredibly rapid development of vaccines and rapid test kits has also required strategies to get them to people and, in many cases, get them accepted.

“We have instituted clinics everywhere,” says Cauce. In the case of the UW and the Seattle community, the practical response also meant practical interventions such as bringing together partners to bring supply trucks to neighborhoods, where they could reach those unable to reach clinics.

“We were really able to bring all of this knowledge together, both in scientific terms but also in terms of policy, in a way that created impact,” says Cauce.

She is determined to draw lessons from this tumultuous period that can be applied more broadly and in the longer term.

“What we’re working to do at the University of Washington is really, in a sense, to rewire this very large, very comprehensive institution in a way that can better provide the solutions to the needs of our world.”

Part of it is acting ‘deliberately’, she says, ‘but part of it is done [differently]: giving a boost to serendipity”.

A major focus of UW is its Population Health Initiative, a 2016 effort to bring together scientists working in human health, social and economic equity, and environmental resilience to study solutions to large scale that are beyond the scope and reach of these individual sectors.

Its projects include identifying and mitigating the factors that worsen the health and shorten the lifespan of minority communities, with a focus on areas such as improving maternal health and protecting urban green spaces. .

Part of this strategy has been the construction of the Hans Rosling Center for Population Health, where researchers from different disciplines are physically brought together to live and work together for long periods of time.

The idea, says Cauce, is to “make sure people from different disciplines talk to each other.”

Of course, such initiatives are not unique to higher education, especially at better-funded institutions, but UW has other strategies to overcome chronic barriers to — or, as Cauce sees them, apologies against – real interdisciplinary environments.

One is to find department heads – deans who are genuinely committed to working beyond their disciplinary boundaries – and to ensure that all their subordinates understand this and are incentivized accordingly. “It’s really about what we value,” Cauce says. “One of the things that really excites me is that we’re very deliberately trying to hire deans who are collaborating, and I think we’ve changed the culture here.”

The other important factor is funding. It would be useful, she acknowledges, for the major national research funders to place more emphasis on societal issues and scientific paths that require and nurture collaborative perspectives.

But in the meantime, UW is doing it all on its own. “One of the things that’s been really effective here has been creating these little grants that pay for someone outside of your field,” Cauce says.

Examples include a psychologist proposing a mental health study who is offered a $100,000 (£93,000) grant from university resources if the work includes someone from the School of Public Policy, who could translate the results into an implementation program.

“We did this internally. It would be wonderful if we had those kinds of grants at the federal level,” the UW president said.

The overall strategy includes a realization that efforts to promote a greater interdisciplinary mindset should not be viewed solely as something for early-career scholars whose priorities may be more easily driven by threats and tenure and promotion awards.

Longer human lifespans, with professors regularly working past age 65, mean academics “spend most of their lives after being full professors,” Cauce says.

Any administrator who backs down from promoting interdisciplinarity because they see tenure and promotion practices as too immutable is not only mistaken but looking in the wrong place, she argues. According to her, it is too easy to adopt this mentality “as an excuse” to act.

Cauce grew up in Miami after her family emigrated from Cuba and earned her undergraduate degree in English and psychology at the University of Miami, before earning her doctorate in psychology at Yale University. She joined the UW faculty in 1986, became provost in 2011 and president in 2015.

Cauce recently co-edited and contributed to Universities as a fifth power? Opportunities, risks and strategiesa book that brings together some of his ideas to put academic science more clearly at the service of society, especially in times of crisis.

Its title refers to the idea that universities should be understood – alongside the classic American notion of the three branches of US government and the media – as a central force in promoting change for the public good.

Referring to her doctoral supervisor at Yale, Edmund Gordon, who founded the Head Start preschool program, she says, “He always taught me to look for the best in people, to try to find ways to connect with people.

“We live in a world where too often we view people who disagree with us as enemies to be defeated, rather than potential allies to be won.”

paul.basken@timeshighereducation.com


This is part of our “Talking leadership” series of 50 interviews over 50 weeks with leaders from the world’s top universities on how they solve common strategic problems and implement change. Follow the series here.

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Stonebranch announces in-person and virtual training https://seattlewto.org/stonebranch-announces-in-person-and-virtual-training/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/stonebranch-announces-in-person-and-virtual-training/ ALPHARETTA, Ga., Sept. 26, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Stonebranch, a leading provider of service orchestration and automation solutions, today announced that it will host two upcoming events: Innovation Europe and Stonebranch Online 2022. European innovation is an in-person event taking place September 29-30 in Amsterdam and features speakers from Achmea, ING Group, Vermont Information Processing, […]]]>

ALPHARETTA, Ga., Sept. 26, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Stonebranch, a leading provider of service orchestration and automation solutions, today announced that it will host two upcoming events: Innovation Europe and Stonebranch Online 2022.

  • European innovation is an in-person event taking place September 29-30 in Amsterdam and features speakers from Achmea, ING Group, Vermont Information Processing, etc.. The conference is Stonebranch’s premier European event for IT automation professionals. It features sessions on the latest trends in real-time hybrid IT automation and proven automation best practices, as well as networking opportunities with other Stonebranch customers and partners. This year the event takes place at Trippenhuis and REM Amsterdam.
  • stone branch online is a six-week virtual educational forum with live webinars on Tuesdays and Thursdays, October 4 through November 10. Designed to help attendees around the world scale their IT automation and orchestration programs, the 2022 speaker line-up includes experts HCA Healthcare, Red Hat and Seattle Children’s Hospital, among others.

“We are excited to offer our customers two ways to connect with Stonebranch and other industry experts,” said Giuseppe Damiani, CEO of Stonebranch. “Whether in person or online, we help IT professionals learn to orchestrate the universe by unifying their hybrid IT environments with a centralized automation strategy.

Registration is open for Stonebranch Online and Innovation Europe. Click here for more information or to attend the live sessions.

About Stonebranch

Stonebranch designs IT orchestration and automation solutions that transform enterprise IT environments from simple automation of IT tasks to sophisticated automation of real-time business services. Regardless of the degree of automation, the Stonebranch platform is simple, modern and secure. With the Stonebranch universal automation platform, enterprises can seamlessly orchestrate workloads and data across ecosystems and technology silos. Headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, with contact and support points in the Americas, Europe and Asia, Stonebranch serves some of the largest financial, manufacturing, healthcare, travel, transportation, energy and of technology in the world.

Contact
Scott Davis
Vice President of Global Marketing, Stonebranch
scott.davis@stonebranch.com

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Renowned education consultant talks about the growing problem of bullying, bullying in schools – KIRO 7 News Seattle https://seattlewto.org/renowned-education-consultant-talks-about-the-growing-problem-of-bullying-bullying-in-schools-kiro-7-news-seattle/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 05:47:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/renowned-education-consultant-talks-about-the-growing-problem-of-bullying-bullying-in-schools-kiro-7-news-seattle/ SEATTLE — With students back in class, KIRO 7 got to speak with an educational consultant who broke down the growing problem of bullying, bullying and harassment in schools. Erin Jones visited KIRO 7 Studios on Friday. She was Teacher of the Year, honored at the White House, and continues to speak to teachers and […]]]>

SEATTLE — With students back in class, KIRO 7 got to speak with an educational consultant who broke down the growing problem of bullying, bullying and harassment in schools.

Erin Jones visited KIRO 7 Studios on Friday. She was Teacher of the Year, honored at the White House, and continues to speak to teachers and parents across the country about issues and challenges in schools.

When Jones was asked about hate crimes on the rise over the past few years, which KIRO 7 has covered on several occasions, Monique Ming Laven asked, “How do you see this happening in schools?”

Jones replied, “Students are just manifesting what they see in adults. Mostly because the students have been home with their parents, they see adults behaving badly towards each other, they see adults hating each other, whatever else. And the students are just younger versions of the adults they see. And so they see their own parents, but they also see these hate crimes at a very high level with TikTok and Instagram and all the ways they capture media.

Jones then talked about the physical and verbal abuse that happens in schools and where it sits in terms of the ceiling. It also talks about a child’s responsibility when bullied or harassed.

Watch the video above to learn more about bullying and harassment issues at school.

[DOWNLOAD: Free KIRO 7 News app for alerts as news breaks]

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Education takes unusual back seat in Georgia election https://seattlewto.org/education-takes-unusual-back-seat-in-georgia-election/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 18:34:07 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/education-takes-unusual-back-seat-in-georgia-election/ LILBURN, Ga. (AP) — Like schools nationwide, those in Georgia will face big decisions in the years to come. But polls show K-12 education is lagging among voters’ concerns this year, and candidates are spending more time talking about inflation, the economy, abortion and guns. Regarding education issues, mother and former Gwinnett County teacher Missy […]]]>

LILBURN, Ga. (AP) — Like schools nationwide, those in Georgia will face big decisions in the years to come.

But polls show K-12 education is lagging among voters’ concerns this year, and candidates are spending more time talking about inflation, the economy, abortion and guns.

Regarding education issues, mother and former Gwinnett County teacher Missy Purcell says, “I don’t hear much. »

It’s not that Republican incumbent Governor Brian Kemp and Democratic challenger Stacey Abrams don’t have education proposals.

Abrams is proposing a big pay raise for teachers, more state-paid preschool slots for low-income families, and increased aid to universities funded by legalizing casinos. She also promises efforts to block conservative laws that limit what schools can teach about race and make it easier for parents to challenge the books.

“We need to invest in our children from cradle to career and we need to pay our educators a professional salary,” she told Democrats at their state convention in Columbus on Aug. 27. “We need to keep our teachers in the classroom, not the courtroom.

Kemp has rolled out a smaller program, including a grant program to help students learn what they’ve been missing out on during the pandemic, encourage teaching assistants to become full-fledged teachers, and boost funding for counselors. school.

“We need to do more work to address pandemic-related learning loss, bring more educators and counselors into our schools, and keep our students and staff safe,” Kemp said Monday in a school in Statham.

But other concerns seem to crowd out education, especially among Democrats.

Bringing her two children home from Camp Creek Elementary in the Gwinnett County suburb of Lilburn, Katherine Camp said her family moved to the area so her children could attend the much-loved school.

“It’s better than private school in some ways,” Camp said, noting that her two children receive special education services.

Gwinnett is Georgia’s largest school district, with 180,000 students, or more than 10% of statewide enrollment. He’s been a magnet for families, but has seen fights over district leadership in recent years as newly ascendant Democrats have taken over the school board and other county offices.

But Camp said his main issues are health care and ensuring state laws don’t prevent people from voting. Even his primary education issue, preventing school shootings, is primarily about gun control in society.

That’s a drop for what’s traditionally been a core problem, especially in southern states where literacy has lagged.

“Not just in Georgia, but across the South, individuals have been proud to be called the governor of education,” said Charles Bullock, professor of political science at the University of Georgia.

In September 2018, 16% of Georgians in an Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll said “public schools” were the most important election issue that year, tied with health care for second place overall behind the economy. A Fox News poll in August showed that 3% of registered voters in Georgia cite “education” as their top issue in the Senate race.

“Republicans, what they want to talk about is inflation and the economy,” Bullock said. “Democrats want to talk about failed Medicaid expansion, abortion decision.”

But Georgia’s next governor and lawmakers will face crucial decisions, including whether the state should push districts harder to help students recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, whether the state should rewrite its K-12 funding formula, what Georgia can do to recruit and retain more teachers, and how to protect students from shootings.

Georgia is spending more than $25 billion on public schools this year, out of a $58 billion budget, an indication of how education dominates state government. Georgia’s 120,000 public school teachers have always been a key electoral bloc. For example, a teacher revolt in 2002 helped deny Democrat Roy Barnes a second term after the governor tied teacher evaluations and bonuses to student performance and eliminated tenure.

Kemp wooed teachers in 2018, promising a $5,000 pay rise that Abrams called a “gimmicky.” Kemp has delivered on that commitment and has also sought their favor by supporting measures to reduce standardized testing.

But the tone toward education has changed in Georgia after Republican Glenn Youngkin’s gubernatorial victory in Virginia highlighted conservative complaints about schooling. This spring, as Kemp faced a Republican primary challenge, he signed a series of culturally conservative school bills, regulating how race could be taught in schools, making it easier for parents to challenge the books they considered inappropriate and pushing the state athletic association to ban transgender girls from high school sports. Youngkin comes to campaign with Kemp on Tuesday.

These movements have steam teachers. Anthony Downer, a former high school social studies teacher, is the diversity coordinator for the Decatur School District. He is also vice president of Georgia Educators for Equity and Justice, which opposes Georgia law banning the teaching of “dividing concepts” about race.

“Teachers are targeted,” Downer said. “There are situations where parents are already complaining, community members are already complaining about certain texts that deal with race or sexuality, certain lessons or activities.”

Abrams proposed raising the average teacher salary to $75,000 and guaranteeing a starting salary of $50,000. The plan would cost $1.65 billion in new spending.

That sounds appealing to Amber Karasik, a special education teacher at Jenkins Elementary School in Gwinnett County and a board member of the Gwinnett County Educators’ Association. Karasik echoes Abrams’ arguments that Georgia shouldn’t be content to rank 21st in average salary among states at $60,553 a year, though that’s significantly higher than its neighbors.

“We want to keep our best teachers, our best talent, in the state, and for someone who is considering getting a teaching degree, it would probably behoove them to move somewhere else,” Karasik said.

Kemp is not proposing a new salary increase plan. He told Statham he “would love to keep paying state employees more” and argued that teachers should trust him because he kept his $5,000 promise.

Georgia has largely left it to its 181 school districts to decide how to help students recover academically and socially from pandemic-related disruptions. But others want Georgia to better guide districts on effective teaching, pointing to states such as Mississippi that saw test scores rise after implementing the changes.

Purcell said when she briefly returned to teaching after having children, she felt Gwinnett County had done little to educate her about what had changed during her absence. Her youngest son, Matthew, struggled to read until Gwinnett County paid him to attend a special school.

“I would prefer to have a lot more direction from the state level for districts to use evidence-based curricula, especially in our core subjects like reading, writing and math,” Purcell said. “If we don’t set kids up for success from the start, we’re essentially giving them a life sentence of failure.”

___

Follow Jeff Amy on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jeffamy.

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Labor shortages in education, health and railways are fueling labor crises https://seattlewto.org/labor-shortages-in-education-health-and-railways-are-fueling-labor-crises/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 23:34:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/labor-shortages-in-education-health-and-railways-are-fueling-labor-crises/ Exhausted workers in education, health and rail industry retreat after months of staff shortages September 16, 2022 at 4:34 p.m. EDT Striking nurses demonstrate for better working conditions on public sidewalks outside Riverside Hospital September 13 in Minneapolis. (Annabelle Marcovici for the Washington Post) The U.S. economy ground to a halt hours after the shutdown […]]]>

Exhausted workers in education, health and rail industry retreat after months of staff shortages

Striking nurses demonstrate for better working conditions on public sidewalks outside Riverside Hospital September 13 in Minneapolis.
Striking nurses demonstrate for better working conditions on public sidewalks outside Riverside Hospital September 13 in Minneapolis. (Annabelle Marcovici for the Washington Post)

The U.S. economy ground to a halt hours after the shutdown due to a standoff between unions and rail carriers over sick pay and schedules, underscoring how staffing shortages have drastically reshaped workplaces. American workers and pushed exhausted workers back.

With more than 11 million job vacancies and only 6 million unemployed, employers have struggled for more than a year to hire enough people to fill their ranks. This mismatch has left employees frustrated and exhausted, and is fueling a new round of workplace power struggles.

While the rail dispute, which the White House helped resolve early Thursday, has garnered the most attention, a number of other strikes are spreading across the United States. Some 15,000 nurses quit their jobs in Minnesota this week, and healthcare workers in Michigan and Oregon recently authorized strikes. Seattle teachers called off a week-long strike, delaying the start of the school year.

At the center of each of these challenges are widespread labor shortages that have led to deteriorating working conditions. Staffing shortages in key sectors, such as healthcare, hospitality and education, have put unprecedented pressure on millions of workers, sparking a wave of labor disputes as well as new nationwide organizing efforts.

Everything you need to know about the averted rail strike

Too many industries are still struggling to find workers. The share of working-age Americans who have a job or are looking for one is 62.4%, down one percentage point from February 2020, according to Labor Department data.

The reasons are complex and vast. Early retirements, a massive downturn in immigration that began under the Trump administration, and ongoing childcare and elder care challenges, combined with covid-related illnesses and deaths, have all reduces the number of available workers.

“We have about 2.5 million fewer people in the workforce than we were on track with pre-pandemic trends,” said Wendy Edelberg, director of the Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution. “That’s a big number, and that means the people who are still here, who are still in those jobs, have to do even more.”

The stress of working an understaffed position plays a large role in worker grievances, which often revolve around staffing – or lack thereof. Seattle teachers wanted better teacher-student ratios in special education. Railroad conductors and engineers demanded sick leave. And nurses who stopped working in Minnesota said they were seeking more flexible hours and protections from retaliation for reporting understaffing.

“If you look at sectors like nursing homes, local schools, railroads — employment has dropped like a rock,” said Lisa Lynch, economics professor at Brandeis University and former chief economist. of the Department of Labor. “And with that, you see a marked increase in industrial action and strikes. People are tired and overworked.

Biden strikes deal on railroad strike, but worker discontent emerges

Although the US economy has officially recovered the 20 million jobs it lost at the start of the pandemic, the gains have been uneven. Significant gaps remain, particularly in low-wage industries that have lost workers to better-paying opportunities in warehousing, construction, and professional and business services. The hospitality and leisure industry has still lost 1.2 million jobs compared to February 2020. Public schools are short of nearly 360,000 workers and health care has yet to recover 37 000 posts. Rail transport, meanwhile, lost 12,500 jobs.

After months of juggling extra duties, Sabrina Montijo quit her job as a $19-an-hour Bay Area teacher’s aide in August. She now cares for her two young children full time and says she doesn’t know when she will return to work.

“Since the start of the pandemic, we were incredibly understaffed,” said Montijo, 33. “I had to work out of hours because no one was there. We couldn’t find staff and if we did, we constantly had to train someone, always had to start over.

Between the added pressure at work and the difficulty in finding affordable childcare, she says it made sense to leave. Coping with just one income from her husband’s job as a butcher at Safeway hasn’t been easy, but Montijo says it’s better than the alternative.

“It got to the point where I didn’t feel like I had a choice anymore,” she said. “I had to set up arts and crafts, do science projects, make phone calls and talk to parents, all at the same time. There are so many things one person can do.

America faces a catastrophic teacher shortage

Worker burnout has become a persistent problem across the economy, although labor economists say it is particularly pronounced in sectors with severe labor shortages. Many frontline workers in retail, restaurants, education and healthcare who have worked throughout the pandemic – often putting their health and well-being at risk – say their jobs are becoming even more difficult as vacancies pile up.

Although employers across the economy say they are struggling to find and keep workers, labor shortages are most pronounced in retail (where around 70% of vacancies remain unfilled ), manufacturing (about 55%) and leisure and hospitality (45%). according to a U.S. Chamber of Commerce analysis of Department of Labor data.

“When you look at the jobs that are having a hard time hiring, it’s the ones that have very long hours, rigid schedules, low wages and limited benefits,” said Paige Ouimet, professor at Kenan-Flagler Business. School of the University of North Carolina. focuses on finance and labor economics. “Directing your employees like that – asking them to do 20, 30% more because you’re understaffed – it’s really a short-term strategy. You will continue to lose people.

In many cases, employers have started raising wages in the hope of attracting new workers. The largest wage gains were in the lowest-paying industries, such as hospitality, where average hourly wages rose 8.6% from a year ago. (That compares to a 5.2% increase for all workers.)

But while those wage increases may not go far enough to attract or retain workers, economists say they are contributing to inflation. Restaurants, airlines, health care companies and transportation providers are all charging more, in part, they say, due to rising labor costs.

Aveanna Healthcare, which provides home health care and palliative care services, is working with the Medicaid programs it works with to increase reimbursement rates to offset higher salaries for nurses.

“Inflation has pushed our workforce to seek employment that can and will pay higher wages,” Tony Strange, the company’s chief executive, said on an earnings call last month. “We need to increase caregiver salaries by an average of 15% to 25% in certain markets we serve. We will systematically go state by state and contract by contract and adjust reimbursement rates. »

As covid lingers, nurses quit staff jobs – and triple salaries as travelers

New inflation data released this week showed prices remaining stubbornly high, largely due to rising costs for services including healthcare and transport. Unlike the prices of televisions and furniture, which largely depend on the cost of materials and shipping, economists say services inflation tends to be closely tied to worker wages.

“It’s clear that the tight labor market drives wage growth, which leads to price growth,” said Jason Furman, an economics professor at Harvard University. “Services inflation tends to be much more persistent and much more difficult to bring down. Gasoline prices are very volatile. Property prices are somewhat volatile. But in services, if prices are high one month, they are likely to stay high the next month.

It’s unclear if — or when — many of the people who left the workforce during the pandemic will return. This is especially true for workers 55 and older, who stopped working at higher rates. The labor market still lacks more than 500,000 workers in this age group.

“There has been a very significant and persistent decline in labor force participation among workers over the age of 55,” said Edelberg of the Brookings Institution. “The pandemic has been a time of introspection and reassessment, and it has driven many people out of the workforce.”

Joseph White, who lives in Nashville, lost his job at the Guitar Center six months into the pandemic. But he says he had had enough: the store was constantly understaffed and the customers were intractable. In one case, a buyer pointed a gun at him for trying to enforce the company’s mask mandate.

“I’m tired, broken down, exhausted and old,” the 62-year-old said. “I worked to death for so long that finally, I said, there’s no way I’m coming back.”

He started dipping into Social Security payments to make ends meet and helps his wife run her little shop, Black Dog Beads. But White says he has no plans to re-enter the workforce.

“Our quality of life is much better even though we have less income,” he said. “I got tired of being a commodity.”

Lauren Kaori Gurley and Jeff Stein contributed to this report.

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Getting back to education https://seattlewto.org/getting-back-to-education/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 12:55:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/getting-back-to-education/ The road to graduation is not always easy. There may be unexpected dips and potholes in your plans. Challenges can become obstacles blocking your path. This is what happened to Robert Herrera. He was on track to earn a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice at City University in Seattle when he exhausted all of his […]]]>

The road to graduation is not always easy. There may be unexpected dips and potholes in your plans. Challenges can become obstacles blocking your path.

This is what happened to Robert Herrera. He was on track to earn a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice at City University in Seattle when he exhausted all of his student loans and had to take a break from school. By then, he had been taking classes for four years.

“I put my goal on hold to do whatever was necessary to support my family of four,” he says.

Financial issues are one of the top three reasons students “quit” schools, says Britney Taylor, readmissions specialist at CityU. The other two main concerns that cause an interruption in studies are professional reasons such as a job change, job loss or promotion, and personal reasons which include changes or additional responsibilities with family.

Top of the list of those responsibilities has to be having a baby. Tara Mowan says she didn’t handle the stress well during her pregnancy, so she took a break from studying.

“My plan was to skip a term, but it turned into a year,” she says. “My baby is now 16 months and it makes it hard to get things done at times, but not like when I was pregnant.”

Herrera and Mowan returned to class with expert help from Taylor. Herrera had been out of school for two years and had given up on her goal of earning a bachelor’s degree when Taylor contacted him.

“I explained my situation to her and she insisted that I get back on track,” says Herrera. “In my opinion, she went above and beyond because she was able to get my first class canceled and put me in touch with the financial advisor to walk me through their new financial plan programs.”

“The majority of returning students I’ve worked with left school between the ages of one and five,” Taylor says. “But the schedule varies greatly, and I have worked to re-enroll students who have taken a hiatus for more than 10 years.”

Make the most of your time away from class. Consider the reason for the time discrepancy and see if anything can be resolved to allow for a timely return, Taylor says. Talk to someone at your school who might have ideas or resources to help you get back on track sooner.

“Take advantage of professional training and stay in touch with a counselor regarding credits and their transferability,” notes Taylor.

You may want to contact your employer about reimbursement programs or even save funds for your future education through a payroll plan.

Taylor also says to clarify your focus and how your specific program directly benefits you and your career.

Herrera has his direction in mind. He currently works for the Department of Defense, so he hopes to apply his degree in criminal justice (he has completed his courses) to his job down the line.

“I no longer needed to have my diploma for my job, but it was important for me to finish it and show my children that they should not give up,” says Herrera.

When a student is ready to return to class, Taylor likes to talk to them on the phone and let them know how she will work with them and what they can expect.

“From there, it’s about being super resourceful and collaborative in helping returning students achieve their goal of making the switch,” she says.

Mowan is currently pursuing her goal of earning a degree in Business Management by focusing on the Materiel Management stream as a full-time student. She expects to take three classes per term for another three terms. Then she will have a BA in business management.

“It’s definitely worth getting back into education, even if you only take one course at a time,” Taylor says. “You might feel like it will take you forever to finish, but taking that first small step gets you that much closer to your goal.”

Seattle City University is accredited by the doctoral level. Find programs in business, leadership, education, health and human services, computing and information systems. CityU is ranked among the best online bachelor’s degree programs 2022 by US News & World Report.

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UM Liberal Arts completes student education with any major https://seattlewto.org/um-liberal-arts-completes-student-education-with-any-major/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 21:43:32 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/um-liberal-arts-completes-student-education-with-any-major/ A recent survey found that nearly 50% of college graduates who majored in liberal arts and humanities regretted their decision after entering the workforce. We contacted the University of Montana’s Director of Strategic Communications, Dave Kuntz, who responded to this survey. “What makes the University of Montana unique is that we are a liberal arts […]]]>

A recent survey found that nearly 50% of college graduates who majored in liberal arts and humanities regretted their decision after entering the workforce.

We contacted the University of Montana’s Director of Strategic Communications, Dave Kuntz, who responded to this survey.

“What makes the University of Montana unique is that we are a liberal arts institution, but unlike other smaller colleges, we offer students the opportunity to gain this broad knowledge, but also to ‘be specifically qualified,’ began Kuntz. “So no matter what major a student is here at the university, whether they are studying humanities, journalism, wildlife biology or pharmacy, they are also taking this broad general education course rooted in our liberal arts history to make sure they are well prepared for the workforce in the years to come.

Kuntz explained the tools provided by UM to ensure that any graduate can succeed in their chosen field.

“What we have done to ease any kind of frustration that students or alumni have in terms of what they have chosen to study is by implementing initiatives such as Elevate U, which is our initiative work readiness,” she said. “So right now at the University of Montana, no matter what you’re studying or what your major is, whether you’re in the humanities or the sciences, the arts or business, we’re working with students for us. make sure in their very first semester that they get internships. They connect to the workforce. They get the resources that employers are looking for.

Kuntz acknowledged that the WR Franke College of Forestry and Conservation is growing rapidly at UM.

“So we’re really lucky here at the University of Montana that the College of Forestry is one of the fastest growing colleges on our campus,” he said. “It’s because it really works to solve some of the major problems in society today, whether it’s climate change or sustainability or making sure we have healthy forests and a healthy wood industry. We’ve seen students not just from Montana, but from across the country gravitate toward offerings from the College of Forestry, which has some of the fastest growing majors here at the University of Montana.

Kuntz named several other highly successful programs, including the UM College of Business.

“The College of Business here at the University has a long history of preparing people to enter the business world,” he said. “Some of the top business leaders in the state or region have graduated from this college. But we also have huge success at the College of Health. It’s really growing with new offerings here at the university, with a College of Humanities, and continuing to produce students at such a high volume who are also having a significant civic impact on society. As you know, we’re still home to the College of Education where we prepare teachers, Missoula College where we work to create those industry impacts. And then our College of Arts and Media produces some of the best journalists in the world.

According to the University of Montana website, the school enjoys a student-faculty ratio of 13 to 1, with an average class size of 30 students.

14 destinations to visit with direct flights from Missoula

Here’s a list of places to visit (and things to do while you’re there) with nonstop flights from Missoula Montana Airport.

20 Awesome Features of Missoula’s New and Improved Airport

Missoula’s new airport will feature large windows for loved ones to watch planes take off and arrive, and the only escalator this side of Montana! Plus, a keggerator system for the Coldsmoke Tavern.

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Knowles Elects Science Education Researcher and Distinguished Physician and Researcher as Trustees https://seattlewto.org/knowles-elects-science-education-researcher-and-distinguished-physician-and-researcher-as-trustees/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 12:42:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/knowles-elects-science-education-researcher-and-distinguished-physician-and-researcher-as-trustees/ MOORESTOWN, NJ, September 12, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Knowles Teachers Initiative announced the appointment of dr. Melissa Braaten and dr. Steve Emerson to its board of directors. Dr. Braaten and Dr. Emerson were elected to the May 13 annual meeting of its board of directors. “Dr. Braaten and Dr. Emerson are very accomplished in the […]]]>

MOORESTOWN, NJ, September 12, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Knowles Teachers Initiative announced the appointment of dr. Melissa Braaten and dr. Steve Emerson to its board of directors. Dr. Braaten and Dr. Emerson were elected to the May 13 annual meeting of its board of directors.

“Dr. Braaten and Dr. Emerson are very accomplished in the fields of science and education,” said Tint Lawrence, Council of Knowles Chairman of the Board of Directors. “As trustees, they will draw on their vast experience to provide invaluable guidance as we strive to improve the teaching and learning of math and science in the United States”

Dr. Braaten is an associate professor of science education and co-chair of the Elementary to Middle School Teacher Education Program. University of Colorado, Boulderwhere she has worked since 2016. Previously, she worked as an assistant teacher and director of the high school science education program at The University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Braaten has authored or co-authored more than 20 journal articles and book chapters. She has notably co-authored a widely read and influential book, An ambitious scientific education (2018), via Harvard Education Press. Dr. Braaten holds a BS in Microbiology and an MS in Education, both from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and a Ph.D. in the curriculum and teaching and teaching of the sciences of University of Washington. Before obtaining her doctorate, she taught elementary, middle and high school science for 13 years at Texas and in South of Seattle.

“The Knowles Teacher Initiative invests not only in teacher learning, but also in teacher leadership to transform math and science education for every student. This investment is a game-changer for teachers and their students – it is why I am committed to serving on the board,” said Dr. Braaten.

Dr. Emerson graduated summa cum laude from Haverford College in 1974 with a double major in philosophy and chemistry. He obtained a master’s degree in molecular biophysics, a doctorate. in cell biology and immunology, and an MD from Yale University. After graduating from YaleSteve was on the faculties of University of Michigan and Harvard Universitybefore joining the faculty of University of Pennsylvania. There he served as the Francis C. Wood Professor of Medicine, Pathology, and Pediatrics, and served as Chief of Hematology/Oncology and Associate Director of Clinical/Translational Research at the Abramson Center. Dr. Emerson was President of Haverford College from 2007 to 2011, after which he served as Director of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at New –Presbyterian Hospital/Colombia University Medical Center. Now semi-retired, he teaches middle school math at Friends Central School in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania.

“From my experience as a scientist, doctor, teacher and parent, I know how important inspiring teachers are to young math and science students,” said Dr Emerson. “They can make all the difference in our children’s future lives and careers, their happiness and their abilities to contribute to our society. I am delighted and honored to work with the leaders of the Knowles Teacher Initiative on the Board of supportive administration of the dozens of current and future members of Knowles Teacher Fellows whose lives and careers they so directly support.”

About the Knowles Teachers Initiative

The Knowles Teacher Initiative is a nonprofit organization that supports a national network of math and science teachers who are collaborative and innovative leaders improving education for all students in United States. We strive to create an education system led by teachers who are equipped to solve tough problems and respond to local challenges to serve all students in our country. For more information, visit www.knowlesteachers.org.

Media Contact
Ebony free man
Knowles Teachers Initiative
856.608.3237
[email protected]

SOURCE Knowles Teacher Initiative

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Education Fair in Mumbai on September 12 https://seattlewto.org/education-fair-in-mumbai-on-september-12/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 16:47:37 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/education-fair-in-mumbai-on-september-12/ Yocket, India’s community-based digital platform for study abroad applicants, in collaboration with the US Commerce Service (part of the US Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration) as part of the Trade Mission of Education in India, will hold Physical Education Fairs in Mumbai on 12th September 2022 at St Regis Hotel and in Delhi on […]]]>

Yocket, India’s community-based digital platform for study abroad applicants, in collaboration with the US Commerce Service (part of the US Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration) as part of the Trade Mission of Education in India, will hold Physical Education Fairs in Mumbai on 12th September 2022 at St Regis Hotel and in Delhi on 15th September 2022 at Imperial Hotel. Timings will be 5:00-7:00 PM IST for both events. Students can register for the event online through the official website and offline during the event itself.

The two-hour event aims to aid in the decision-making process of students wishing to study in the United States for higher education by bringing together a wide range of industry leaders who can share their experiences.

Students will be able to get advice from more than 20 representatives from universities in California, New York, Chicago, Texas and other parts of the United States. Universities include the University of Virginia, Stony Brook University, Pennsylvania State University, Seattle City University, and many more.

Attendees can attend live education seminars by experts, student visa information sessions by the U.S. Consulate General VISA, and interact with U.S. Trade Services officials as well as co-founders and advisors of Yoket. This will help participants resolve their concerns regarding the proper admission test, application processes, attractive scholarships, career advancement opportunities, profile building, and funding.

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