Seattle parks – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 11:27:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://seattlewto.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Seattle parks – Seattle WTO http://seattlewto.org/ 32 32 Rantz: Seattle Parks staged racist event deliberately excluding whites https://seattlewto.org/rantz-seattle-parks-staged-racist-event-deliberately-excluding-whites/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 05:03:28 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/rantz-seattle-parks-staged-racist-event-deliberately-excluding-whites/ Seattle Parks and Recreation promotes and co-hosts an event at Discovery Park open to everyone except white people. Once again, the city embraces a segregationist culture in the name of inclusion. Discovery Park’s “Interactive Beach Walk” coincides with Seattle Forrest Week. The event was in partnership with Sea Potential, an environmental non-profit organization that seeks […]]]>

Seattle Parks and Recreation promotes and co-hosts an event at Discovery Park open to everyone except white people. Once again, the city embraces a segregationist culture in the name of inclusion.

Discovery Park’s “Interactive Beach Walk” coincides with Seattle Forrest Week. The event was in partnership with Sea Potential, an environmental non-profit organization that seeks to connect young people of color to the sea through “healing activities and conversations about ocean justice”.

Although the city of Seattle prohibits discrimination, this event was “open only to anyone who identifies as BIPOC.” This is not the first time that Seattle Parks has organized discriminatory events.

Beach walk for everyone – except whites

The event, which took place last Sunday, aimed to connect the community with nature. Discovery Park is one of the few parks in the area that is not overrun with homeless people, which makes it perfect for an event like this. But the invitation makes it clear who is and is not invited.

“We invite you to explore what you can learn about yourself and the community, as we strengthen our sense of belonging and appreciate nature in a way that is culturally relevant to our experiences as Black, Indigenous and People of Color. This event is open to anyone who identifies as BIPOC ”, indicates the description of the event.

Seattle’s municipal code (12/18/280) prohibits race exclusion events in Seattle parks. The city’s non-discrimination policy “also ensures that every effort will be made to ensure non-discrimination in all of its program activities, whether these programs and activities are funded by the federal government or not.”

Seattle Parks did not guarantee the event would be non-discriminatory – intentionally. This is yet another example of the city’s obsession with race.

Excuse racism while pretending the outdoors is white space

Seattle Parks did not respond to a Sunday email requesting comment.

I suspect they’ll say it’s not alone for racial minorities; it does not really exclude whites. After all, the description of the event does not explicitly say that white people cannot attend. This would, of course, be a fallacious argument.

By saying that the event is “open to anyone who identifies as BIPOC”, it is inferred that if you do not “identify” as a person of color, you will not be able to attend.

Its intention is exclusion.

Under the pretext that this beach walk will be “culturally appropriate”, it aims to exclude whites. Racial radicals claim that these spaces are “centered” around whites. Sierra Club’s Lornett Vestal called the exterior unbearably white. Activist Glenn Nelson argued that “the outdoors remains a largely white domain” and said it is “up to white America to invite communities of color, to enlist us as allies”.

Does this Seattle Parks event expose its staff’s White Savior Complex?

Seattle Parks has a bigoted history

In the past, the department has turned a blind eye to racist events in its parks.

In June 2021, LGBTQ organizers hosted “Taking B (l) ack Pride” at Jimi Hendrix Park. They said they would charge a “repair fee” for whites to attend. This is illegal behavior in a park owned by Seattle. But Seattle Parks didn’t want to get involved.

The department said it was not issuing permits for the park due to an on-site construction project. But even after learning of the unauthorized event, a spokesperson said the department would not investigate the blatantly discriminatory event.

Seattle weather celebrates racism

By for the course, the Seattle Times embraced the exclusionary events of the race with a feature article. They did not call or question the events based on the race. Instead, they call the beach walk a “spirit of inclusion”.

Lisa Ciecko is a plant ecologist with the Green Seattle Partnership. The group is behind the organization and promotion of Forrest Week events.

Ciecko notes the exclusionary strategy of the city’s plans, telling the Seattle Times that many events are intended to “prioritize BIPOC participation.” The article was more of a press release than a report.

No, we don’t need to separate appreciation from nature

The outdoors is not a “white space” no matter what racing scammers tell you.

Everyone can enjoy nature. Seeing more white people in Seattle parks or on hikes is more a reflection of the demographics of the population than anything else. This is not the result of a concerted effort to prevent anyone from hiking or enjoying an afternoon at the park.

Progressives now reject what was once a common goal: to bring people together regardless of race. Instead of uniting people regardless of race, progressives now want to make everyone talk about race, judging you as an oppressor or an underdog based on your skin color. They have taken a position to see everything through the lens of race – this is critical race theory in action. This worldview harms society, it does not improve it.

If you are offended that too many white people are enjoying nature, then you are the racist.

Listen to the Jason Rantz Show weekday afternoons from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on KTTH 770 AM (or HD Radio 97.3 FM HD-Channel 3). Subscribe to podcast here.


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Seattle Parks staged a racist event deliberately excluding whites https://seattlewto.org/seattle-parks-staged-a-racist-event-deliberately-excluding-whites/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 01:02:33 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/seattle-parks-staged-a-racist-event-deliberately-excluding-whites/ Seattle Parks and Recreation promoted and co-hosted an event at Discovery Park open to everyone except white people. Once again, the city embraces a segregationist culture in the name of inclusion. Discovery Park’s “Interactive Beach Walk” coincides with Seattle Forest Week. The event was in partnership with Sea Potential, an environmental non-profit organization that seeks […]]]>

Seattle Parks and Recreation promoted and co-hosted an event at Discovery Park open to everyone except white people. Once again, the city embraces a segregationist culture in the name of inclusion.

Discovery Park’s “Interactive Beach Walk” coincides with Seattle Forest Week. The event was in partnership with Sea Potential, an environmental non-profit organization that seeks to connect young people of color to the sea through “healing activities and conversations about ocean justice”.

Although the city of Seattle prohibits discrimination, this event was “open only to anyone who identifies as BIPOC.” This is not the first time that Seattle Parks has been given the green light for discriminatory events.

Beach walk for everyone – except whites

The event, which took place last Sunday, aimed to connect the community with nature. Discovery Park is one of the few parks in the area that is not overrun with homeless people, which makes it perfect for such an event. But the invitation makes it clear who is and is not invited.

“We invite you to explore what you can learn about yourself and the community, as we strengthen our sense of belonging and appreciate nature in a way that is culturally relevant to our experiences as Black, Indigenous and People of Color. This event is open to anyone who identifies as BIPOC ”, indicates the description of the event.

Seattle’s municipal code (12/18/280) prohibits race exclusion events in Seattle parks. The city’s non-discrimination policy “also ensures that every effort will be made to ensure non-discrimination in all of its program activities, whether these programs and activities are funded by the federal government or not.”

Seattle Parks did not guarantee the event would be non-discriminatory – intentionally. This is yet another example of the city’s obsession with race.

Excuse racism while pretending the outdoors is white space

Seattle Parks did not respond to a Sunday email requesting comment.

I suspect they’ll say it’s not alone for racial minorities; it does not really exclude whites. After all, the description of the event does not explicitly say that white people cannot attend. This would, of course, be a fallacious argument.

By saying that the event is “open to anyone who identifies as BIPOC”, it is inferred that if you do not “identify” as a person of color, you will not be able to attend.

Its intention is exclusion.

Under the pretext that this beach walk will be “culturally appropriate”, it aims to exclude whites. Racial radicals claim that these spaces are “centered” around whites. Sierra Club’s Lornett Vestal called the outside an insufferable white. Activist Glenn Nelson argued that “the outdoors remains a largely white domain” and said it is “up to white America to invite communities of color, to enlist us as allies”.

Does this Seattle Parks event expose its staff’s White Savior Complex?

Seattle Parks has a bigoted history

In the past, the department has turned a blind eye to racist events in its parks.

In June 2021, LGBTQ organizers hosted “Taking B (l) ack Pride” at Jimi Hendrix Park. They said they would charge a “repair fee” for whites to attend. This is illegal behavior in a park owned by Seattle. But Seattle Parks didn’t want to get involved.

The department said it was not issuing permits for the park due to an on-site construction project. But even after learning of the unauthorized event, a spokesperson said the department would not investigate the blatantly discriminatory event.

Seattle weather celebrates racism

By for the course, the Seattle Times embraced the race exclusion events with a report. They did not call or question the events based on the race. Instead, they call the beach walk a “spirit of inclusion”.

Lisa Ciecko is a plant ecologist at the Green Seattle Partnership. The group is behind the organization and promotion of Forest Week events.

Ciecko notes the exclusionary strategy of the city’s plans, telling the Seattle Times that many events are intended to “prioritize BIPOC participation.” The article was more of a press release than a report.

No, we don’t need to separate appreciation from nature

The outdoors is not a “white space” no matter what racing scammers tell you.

Everyone can enjoy nature. Seeing more white people in Seattle parks or on hikes is more a reflection of the demographics of the population than anything else. This is not the result of a concerted effort to prevent anyone from hiking or enjoying an afternoon at the park.

Progressives now reject what was once a common goal: to bring people together regardless of race. Instead of uniting people regardless of race, progressives now want to make everyone talk about race, judging you as an oppressor or an underdog based on your skin color. They have taken a position to see everything through the lens of race – this is critical race theory in action. This worldview harms society, it does not improve it.

If you are offended that too many white people are enjoying nature, then you are the racist.

UPDATE, 11/08/21, 3:45 p.m .:

On Monday afternoon, Seattle Parks made the following statement:

This was an event with a partner agency which aimed to provide a support space for the BIPOC community to participate in an event in the natural space of our park. The community made us realize that people of color do not always feel welcome or cannot enjoy natural or public spaces. As part of our mission, we aim to serve all residents and visitors to our city, and for many communities that seem to have targeted programming that meets their needs, and intentionally invites them.

We have programs for children, seniors, transgender and non-binary people, the LGBTQIA community, women, people with disabilities, and the list goes on. Our public spaces are open to all, yet we are committed to recognizing the historical and current discrimination that has prevented many people from enjoying public spaces, by delivering programs that mitigate the impacts of racism and discrimination, and by ensuring so that all communities can benefit from it. parks and recreation programs. As such, the focus of our message was aimed at the BIPOC community. Nonetheless, the message could have been clearer that the park is open to everyone, and we had no intention of turning people away.

Listen to the Jason Rantz Show weekday afternoons from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on KTTH 770 AM (or HD Radio 97.3 FM HD-Channel 3). Subscribe to podcast here.


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Keep Seattle parks free of tents after camps are removed https://seattlewto.org/keep-seattle-parks-free-of-tents-after-camps-are-removed/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/keep-seattle-parks-free-of-tents-after-camps-are-removed/ Seattle is a compassionate city ready to invest in solutions that help people living outside. Spending on homeless people and social services in the city’s 2021 budget exceeded $ 218 million. In return, the town hall is expected to promise residents that once outreach workers connect with people living in the parks and those public […]]]>

Seattle is a compassionate city ready to invest in solutions that help people living outside. Spending on homeless people and social services in the city’s 2021 budget exceeded $ 218 million.

In return, the town hall is expected to promise residents that once outreach workers connect with people living in the parks and those public areas clear of tents, the new settlements will not take root.

The hamster wheel effect of continued camping in the parks – still illegal in the city – reinforces cynicism that this problem can never be solved and that no public investment will be enough to restore the city’s exquisite amenities for the sake of the city. all.

Seattle parks and recreation officials quietly instituted such a “clear and hold” practice. While there were a few notable exceptions, the agency is to be commended for pursuing the right strategy.

Last month, Parks crews finally cleared the last trash from City Hall grounds, and around $ 15 million in public funds helped the roughly 70 people living in tents move to better arrangements. But King County Superior Court judges who had dealt with related disruptions at the nearby courthouse had a crucial question.

“Once opened, what will prevent the scenario from reverting to the status quo, because it’s an easy place to pitch tents and for people to take shelter?” the court’s chief criminal justice, Sean O’Donnell, asked the Metropolitan King County Council.

Workers at the King County Courthouse, just north of City Hall Park, were so concerned about public safety surrounding the encampment that they staged a protest and demanded greater protection from assault and other threatening behavior. Before the park was cleaned up, the judges had called for its immediate closure.

Responding to Judge O’Donnell’s question, Parks spokesperson Rachel Schulkin said: “As with previous camp withdrawals, all new camping is not permitted and tents are being withdrawn.”

The city has made more than 30 camp cuts with the policy, she said. For example, Miller Playfield, Cal Anderson, Williams Place, and Denny Park returned to being fully used as parks.

Once outreach workers make significant offers for shelter and remove an encampment, park staff quickly identify any new tents that appear. Within a day or two, staff let people know they couldn’t camp in the park, and people largely comply, Schulkin said.

There have been at least two exceptions to this policy: University Playground and Ballard Commons Park. In these places, the camps have returned after intensive awareness raising efforts.

The Ballard Commons Park encampment was removed in 2020 and outreach workers are currently working on a new plan, Schulkin said. At the university playground, no camping signs were posted on August 30 and the remaining personal effects were due to be removed on Wednesday.

These setbacks underscore the need for effective enforcement of camping protection rules in parks and green spaces after outreach workers help homeless people find more stable arrangements.

Park by park, local authorities should align resources to bring people in and make Seattle’s open spaces for public use.

Equally important, it means ensuring that once an investment in awareness and housing has been made, there is no turning back to an unacceptable status quo.


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West Seattle Blog… | FALL FITNESS: Outdoor Classes for Lifelong Recreation at Seattle Parks Community Centers https://seattlewto.org/west-seattle-blog-fall-fitness-outdoor-classes-for-lifelong-recreation-at-seattle-parks-community-centers/ Mon, 30 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/west-seattle-blog-fall-fitness-outdoor-classes-for-lifelong-recreation-at-seattle-parks-community-centers/ Seattle Parks is offering outdoor fitness classes at local community centers this fall, including its Permanent leisure program for 50+. Here are three that they highlight; each class title is linked to a page with online registration and more information: Soft yoga at the climax: 09/13/18, 10 a.m. on Monday Stretch and move with awareness, […]]]>

Seattle Parks is offering outdoor fitness classes at local community centers this fall, including its Permanent leisure program for 50+. Here are three that they highlight; each class title is linked to a page with online registration and more information:

Soft yoga at the climax: 09/13/18, 10 a.m. on Monday

Stretch and move with awareness, correct alignment, and concentration on the breath to increase strength and endurance, improve flexibility, and develop better balance, posture, poise, and peace of mind.

Fitness in Delridge: 08/09/10/20, 10:30 am on Wednesday

Build total body muscle strength using fitness bands, free weights, and floor exercises. Improve balance, flexibility and agility. The instructor is a professional dance and fitness instructor and performer. Please bring weights to class

Thriller dance at Delridge: 9 / 9-10 / 21, 11:30 am Thursdays

Learn the “Thrill the World” version of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” dance. In this session you will learn all the steps and practice all the dance (no dance experience is necessary). If there is interest, the instructor will provide quick advice on zombie makeup, character, and costumes. All participants will receive a dance script so you can practice at home. After this class, you’ll be ready to participate in Thriller’s next flash mob or be the hit at your next party! The instructor is a professional dance and fitness instructor, performer, and has taught and performed Thriller since 2008.

You can also register by phone at 206-684-5177. Classes will be moved indoors in the event of bad weather.


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Seven black women, claiming discrimination during their Seattle Parks Department careers, sue https://seattlewto.org/seven-black-women-claiming-discrimination-during-their-seattle-parks-department-careers-sue/ Fri, 23 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/seven-black-women-claiming-discrimination-during-their-seattle-parks-department-careers-sue/ Grace Brown worked for the Seattle Department of Parks and Recreation for nearly three decades, primarily as a worker cleaning park bathrooms, she says. “I did my job well, hoping that one day I could improve,” said Brown, 59. She never did. Brown was hired as a laborer and resigned as a laborer, spending the […]]]>

Grace Brown worked for the Seattle Department of Parks and Recreation for nearly three decades, primarily as a worker cleaning park bathrooms, she says.

“I did my job well, hoping that one day I could improve,” said Brown, 59.

She never did.

Brown was hired as a laborer and resigned as a laborer, spending the first 14 years as a seasonal employee with no benefits, she says.

“My season lasted 14 years… without vacations, without medical care,” said the grandmother raised in the Central District, whose job also included fieldwork in the parks.

Brown has trained new employees multiple times and has been interviewed multiple times for better positions, she says. But her career came and went without promotion (other than when she was granted permanent status) even when employees who weren’t black moved up, she says.

“There were a lot of people who got into this profession and now they’re a team leader and supervisors,” Brown said.

Now Brown and six other black women who worked for the parks department are suing the city, alleging racial discrimination and disparate treatment based on race and gender.

“It’s a bitter pill that we have swallowed, and now it’s time for us to speak up,” she said.

Most complainants allege that they have been denied promotions, most allege that they have been subject to retaliation for various reasons, and several say that they have been wrongly disciplined. All of them are over 40 years old.

Three still work for the Parks Department, while three say they felt compelled to quit, and one alleges she was wrongly fired.

Their lawsuit, filed last August, seeks unspecified damages, arguing that they have made less money over the years than they would have had with promotions and other opportunities. He alleges that supervisors and department directors have been “responsible for perpetuating a hostile work environment towards African-American women.”

“What they can all show is that they were treated differently,” said Oscar Desper III, lawyer for the plaintiffs.

Last October, the Seattle city attorney’s office filed a court response denying the main allegations, and the case is slated to go to trial in 2022. Beyond that, the parks department declined to comment. The department does not comment on the pending lawsuits, a spokesperson said.

Complainants have many stories

Every woman who sues the city has a history of working at Parks, some more complicated than others. Brown was ignored for promotions that would have allowed her to make more money and work indoors, she says.

Recreation specialist Angela Smith, 44, says she spent 17 years at Parks without any promotions or out-of-class opportunities, allowing employees to earn more money and gain experience on a base. temporary in another job category. Assistant recreation coordinator Dawn Bennett, 57, says she was refused promotion to a community center coordinator position she already held outside of the classroom. The job went to a white man, she said.

Patricia Young, 58, says she left the parks department in the same secretary position she had been hired 24 years earlier. Sacha Wyatt, 45, says she was screened out of promotions and turned down for an electrical apprenticeship interview because she was three minutes late. She was late because the West Seattle Bridge was malfunctioning, says Wyatt, a laborer. A white man got the job, she said.

Cherryl Jackson Williams, 48, former recreation specialist, says she has been unfairly demoted, with the Parks Department citing unsatisfactory credit card reconciliation and billing job. Kelly Guy, 54, former recreation manager, says she was wrongly fired, the department citing a pattern of inappropriate communication with employees and members of the public.

The women allege that they were treated differently from male employees and non-black employees in similar situations.

Some say they have been denied promotions not because of their work in the department and with community members, but rather because of their “interview skills”.

“It’s a system of doing things,” said Bennett, a candidate for mayor from Kent. “I had to be everything and then some… I just was never good enough in the interview rooms.”

Filing complaints at work is risky for black women, who tend to be characterized as troublemakers, according to several complainants. At the Parks Department, complaints have sometimes led to worse conditions, they say.

“You have to be very intentional about how you represent your challenges because you know they are just waiting for that moment when you present everything that looks like an angry black woman,” said Jackson Williams.

Some details of the trial – such as the allegations of racist remarks and the circumstances in which the promotions and discipline took place – are difficult to assess, as park department officials declined to comment and because the court’s response from the city did not present alternative narratives.

For example, the city court response acknowledged that Brown was never promoted, other than from seasonal worker to permanent worker. The response did not address his allegations about the interns who were subsequently promoted.

The department declined to provide information about the plaintiffs’ employment, ordering the Seattle Times to file a public registration application instead. This request is pending.

The lawsuit in some, but not all, cases names male employees and employees who are not black, who would have been treated better. The case may depend on whether the complainants can support these kinds of examples.

The costume in context

The data provides some context for the trial. Parks is one of the city’s largest departments and employs more black women than most departments, according to payroll records provided by the city’s human resources department.

Last year, about 8.5% of employees paid by the Parks Department with any number of hours worked were black women, according to records. About 6.5% paid by Parks with at least 1,000 hours worked were black women. Employees who identify as “two or more races” are listed separately in the records.

Among Parks Department employees who worked 1,000 hours or more in 2020, black women earned an average of $ 69,400 in gross wages, while black men averaged $ 69,300, white women averaged $ 80,000. , white men average $ 79,000 and all employees average $ 75,300.

Black women received 6.6% of all Parks promotions from 2010 to mid-May 2021, according to promotion records provided by the human resources department. They worked about 8.7% of all non-classroom hours last year.

Last year, very few Parks Service employees with “manager” or “executive” in their title were black women.

Department officials declined to comment or confirm these data points, which were not included in the trial, as the Times interviewed them at the same time as the trial.

Desper, the lawyer, asked if the promotion records were complete and accurate. He noted the scarcity of black women in the upper ranks of the parks department.

The plaintiffs and their attorneys, Desper and Robert Fulton, cite a 2018 study by graduate students at the University of Washington’s Evans School of Public Policy.

The study, which reviewed documents and interviewed employees to assess the Parks Department’s implementation of the Seattle Race and Social Justice Initiative, yielded results that are consistent with the lawsuit. The initiative was launched in 2004 to tackle racial inequalities by applying a special focus to all city work.

The researchers found “a general feeling of mistrust” among Parks, with many employees afraid to honestly express their opinions on the initiative, and “a perception that hiring and promotion opportunities are more likely to be. granted to whites “.

The study also found that white employees were more likely to have positive experiences in the department and that “some employees of color feel symbolized, especially those in managerial positions.”

The researchers wrote, “Black women have consistently reported being ignored for advancement opportunities in favor of white people,” although they paved the way for RSJI efforts.

Racial justice work

RSJI’s efforts within departments are led by employees, like Young and Smith, who volunteer for additional work.

Young and Smith say they were targeted by superiors who opposed and complained about RSJI’s efforts, especially when they raised questions about racism in the workplace.

“This is the job the city wanted us to do… and I kept them at their word,” Young said.

Many of the complainants grew up in Parks programs and began working in the ministry when they were still teenagers.

Guy and Bennett once ran late night programs. Brown worked at the Garfield Community Center when Smith was growing up there. Smith knew she wanted to work for the department as well.

They say the way they were treated sounds like betrayal.

“I came to the parks department on welfare. I quit welfare and started my life with my daughter, ”said Brown, recalling how she encouraged her nieces and nephews to work in the parks department.

Now she doesn’t know what to say.

“That’s why we’re here,” Brown said. “Yes, there are repairs you have to pay for. But the main thing that you need to get is that you are not going to make it to the next generation. “



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Seattle Parks and Recreation extends early closing hours at Alki Beach Park https://seattlewto.org/seattle-parks-and-recreation-extends-early-closing-hours-at-alki-beach-park/ Fri, 09 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/seattle-parks-and-recreation-extends-early-closing-hours-at-alki-beach-park/ Alec Regimbal, Seattle PI July 9, 2021Update: July 9, 2021 at 11:04 p.m. 1of9 Sunset over Alki Beach in Seattle. Schafer & Hill / Getty ImagesShow moreShow less 2of9Teenager party on Alki beach, July 27, 2016.GRANT HINDSLEY / SEATTLEPI.COMShow moreShow less 3of9 4of9Gabrielle Bihary holds Alex Nugent in her arms as they watch a pump […]]]>

Alki Beach Park in West Seattle will continue to close early during the rest of the summer, according to Seattle Parks and Recreation.

The department said Alki will continue to close at 10 p.m. until September 12. The department began shutting down the park at the start of the July 4 bank holiday weekend, citing public safety concerns.

“Based on the positive feedback from the community, as well as continuing concerns about illegal activity and public safety concerns at Alki Beach Park during the busy summer months, SPR has decided to extend the temporary early closure,” the department wrote on its website on Friday.

The park previously closed at 11:30 p.m. The opening time, 4:30 a.m., has not changed.

A popular park for watching the sunset, Alki has seen a handful of violent incidents in recent months. In June, four people were shot dead near the park after two groups had an altercation. One person died.

In May, police closed the park one night after an armed robbery was reported and multiple brawls broke out at a large rally. As the police tried to disperse the crowd, bottles were thrown and a policeman broke his thumb.

The department also began closing Golden Gardens Park early from late June due to public safety concerns. This park will close almost two hours earlier until March 2022, when the hours will be reassessed.

To help alleviate security concerns at Alki, the department has increased the number of night workers to five. He also calls for all beach fires to be extinguished earlier, with a forced shutdown at 9:30 p.m.

Unless the department extends early closures a second time, the beach will resume closing at 11:30 p.m. on September 13.


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Parkways Blog: Seattle Parks And Recreation To Temporarily Close Alki Beach Park At 10:00 PM During Holiday Weekend https://seattlewto.org/parkways-blog-seattle-parks-and-recreation-to-temporarily-close-alki-beach-park-at-1000-pm-during-holiday-weekend/ Sat, 03 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/parkways-blog-seattle-parks-and-recreation-to-temporarily-close-alki-beach-park-at-1000-pm-during-holiday-weekend/ Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) is implementing new temporary closure times at Alki Beach Park (2665 Alki Ave. SW) from Friday July 2 to Monday July 5. The park will close every day at 10 p.m. (instead of 11 a.m.). : 30 pm) and reopen normally at 4:30 am This temporary closing time change, authorized […]]]>

Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) is implementing new temporary closure times at Alki Beach Park (2665 Alki Ave. SW) from Friday July 2 to Monday July 5. The park will close every day at 10 p.m. (instead of 11 a.m.). : 30 pm) and reopen normally at 4:30 am

This temporary closing time change, authorized by SMC 18.12.040, is intended to deter the illegal use of fireworks and to help mitigate illegal activity in the park during the planned busy holiday weekend. Alki Beach Park has seen an increase in public safety concerns, including acts of violence, excessive noise violations, illegal fires and unauthorized events.

SPR has already implemented several strategies to try to discourage illegal behavior at Alki Beach Park:

  • Public education: To clarify and publicize the beach fire rules and other park rules, we use our website and social media resources, sandwich signs in the park, and most recently two large electronic read signs indicating that fires are only authorized in authorized fireplaces. , and the time at which fires should be extinguished. (Reading board messaging may change to reflect updates.)
  • Reinforced staffing: Five staff members are on the beach every night. They remind park users that fires can only be in homes and must be extinguished before 9:30 p.m. remind park users that amplified music is prohibited; pick up the rubbish; cleaning and restocking the toilets.
  • Reduced hours for fires: Staff extinguish beach fires before 9:30 a.m. every evening.
  • SPD coordination: We remain in close communication and strategize with SPD regarding efforts to enforce laws and prevent illegal behavior.

Alki Beach Park will continue to allow beach fires during vacation weekends in designated rings of fire. All beach fires must be extinguished by 9:30 p.m. and all visitors will be asked to leave the park by 10:00 p.m. Please review the Beach Fire Rules. here.

Daily hours of operation for Alki Beach Park will be 4:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. starting July 6, 2021.


This press release was produced by Parkways Blog. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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West Seattle Blog… | HOLIDAY WEEKEND: Seattle Parks says Alki Beach will close early for next 4 nights https://seattlewto.org/west-seattle-blog-holiday-weekend-seattle-parks-says-alki-beach-will-close-early-for-next-4-nights/ Fri, 02 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/west-seattle-blog-holiday-weekend-seattle-parks-says-alki-beach-will-close-early-for-next-4-nights/ (WSB file photo) Last week, the city announced the closure of a 9-month pilot program Golden gardens, Ballard Beach Park, at 10 p.m., but nothing for Alki. Today – four days after a deadly shooting – an ad that Alki will close this early, but only for the next four nights: Seattle Parks and Recreation […]]]>

(WSB file photo)

Last week, the city announced the closure of a 9-month pilot program Golden gardens, Ballard Beach Park, at 10 p.m., but nothing for Alki. Today – four days after a deadly shooting – an ad that Alki will close this early, but only for the next four nights:

Seattle Parks and Recreation is implementing new temporary closure hours at Alki Beach Park (2665 Alki Ave. SW) from Friday July 2 to Monday July 5. The park will close every day at 10 p.m. (instead of 11:30 p.m.). ) and reopen normally at 4:30 a.m.

This temporary closing time change, authorized by SMC 18.12.040, is intended to deter the illegal use of fireworks and to help mitigate illegal activity in the park during the planned busy holiday weekend. Alki Beach Park has seen an increase in public safety concerns, including acts of violence, excessive noise violations, illegal fires and unauthorized events.

SPR has already implemented several strategies to try to discourage illegal behavior at Alki Beach Park:

· Public education: To clarify and publicize the beach fire rules and other park rules, we use our website and social media resources, sandwich signs in the park, and most recently two large electronic read signs indicating that fires are only authorized in authorized fireplaces. , and the time at which fires should be extinguished. (Reading board messaging may change to reflect updates.)

· Reinforced staffing: Five staff members are on the beach every night. They remind park users that fires can only be in homes and must be extinguished before 9:30 p.m. remind park users that amplified music is prohibited; pick up the rubbish; cleaning and restocking the toilets.

· Reduced hours for fires: Staff extinguish beach fires before 9:30 a.m. every evening.

· SPD coordination: We remain in close communication and strategize with SPD regarding efforts to enforce laws and prevent illegal behavior.

Alki Beach Park will continue to allow beach fires during vacation weekends in designated rings of fire. All beach fires must be extinguished by 9:30 p.m. and all visitors will be asked to leave the park by 10 p.m. Please see the Beach Fire Rules here.

Daily hours of operation for Alki Beach Park will be 4:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. starting July 6, 2021.


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Seattle Parks to close Alki Beach early, turn on park lights to prevent crime and damage https://seattlewto.org/seattle-parks-to-close-alki-beach-early-turn-on-park-lights-to-prevent-crime-and-damage/ Fri, 02 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/seattle-parks-to-close-alki-beach-early-turn-on-park-lights-to-prevent-crime-and-damage/ In an effort to reduce fireworks and general infractions, Seattle Parks is closing Alki Beach Park early and turning on lights at area ball fields this weekend. Archive: Alki Beach cleaned up on Saturday night after fighting, arrests Alki Beach Park will close daily at 10 pm instead of 11:30 pm The park will reopen […]]]>

In an effort to reduce fireworks and general infractions, Seattle Parks is closing Alki Beach Park early and turning on lights at area ball fields this weekend.

Archive: Alki Beach cleaned up on Saturday night after fighting, arrests

Alki Beach Park will close daily at 10 pm instead of 11:30 pm The park will reopen at its regular time of 4:30 am daily. The new closing hours start from Friday evening to Monday July 5th.

The city says the temporary change is intended to deter the illegal use of fireworks and help mitigate illegal activity over the holiday weekend.

“Alki Beach Park has seen an increase in public safety concerns, including acts of violence, excessive noise violations, illegal fires and unauthorized events,” the city said in a press release.

Fires are allowed in designated fire rings but must be extinguished before 9:30 p.m.

Parks says there are five staff at the park every night to remind beach goers of the rules. Additionally, Parks works alongside the Seattle Police Department to prevent illegal behavior.

In addition to temporary beach hours, the parks department also plans to turn on lights at ball fields around Seattle on Saturday and Sunday evenings to deter people from using fireworks.

The lights will come on around 8:30 p.m. and most will be off between around 10 p.m. and 11 p.m., depending on the terrain, depending on the city.

“Fireworks are illegal in the city of Seattle and will destroy artificial turf on surrounding fields or facilities,” the city said in a press release.

The city estimates that replacing a full-size lawn will cost about $ 1.2 million.

The lights in the following fields will be off at 11 p.m.

    • Bobby Morris at Cal Anderson Park, 1635 11th Avenue
    • Delridge Playfield, 4458 Delridge Way SW
    • Garfield # 1, E Cherry St & 23rd Ave
    • Genesee Upper and Lower Playfield, 4316 S Genesee St.
    • Georgetown Playground, 750 S Homer St.
    • Hiawatha Playfield, 2700 California Ave. SW
    • Interbay Sports Complex, 3027 17th Ave W
    • Jefferson Playfield, 4165 16th Ave. S
    • Lower Woodland Playfield # 2 and # 7, 5201 Green Lake Way North
    • Walt Hundley Playground, 6920 34th Avenue SW
    • Washington Park Playground, 2500 Lake Washington Blvd. E
    • West Seattle Stadium, 4432 35th Ave. SW

The lights in the following fields will go out at 10 p.m.

      • Loyal Heights Playground, 2101 NW 77th St
      • Mickey Merriam Athletic Field Complex, Magnuson # 5 (Rugby), # 6, # 7, 7400 Sand Point Way NE
      • Miller Playfield, 330 19th Ave. E
      • Brighton Playground, 6000 39th Ave S.

The lights will be off in the following grass fields at 11 p.m.

  • Ballard Playfield, 2644 NW 60th St.
  • Rainier Playground, 3700 S Alaska St.
  • W Queen Anne Playground, 150 W Blaine St.



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Measure that would ban Seattle park camps and housing construction qualifies for November ballot https://seattlewto.org/measure-that-would-ban-seattle-park-camps-and-housing-construction-qualifies-for-november-ballot/ Thu, 01 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://seattlewto.org/measure-that-would-ban-seattle-park-camps-and-housing-construction-qualifies-for-november-ballot/ The charter amendment would order Seattle to keep public spaces free of encampments once new homeless services are in place. SEATTLE – A new charter amendment that would order the city of Seattle to clean up homeless settlements qualified for the November ballot after a signature campaign. “Seattle Compassion” is a voting measure supported by […]]]>

The charter amendment would order Seattle to keep public spaces free of encampments once new homeless services are in place.

SEATTLE – A new charter amendment that would order the city of Seattle to clean up homeless settlements qualified for the November ballot after a signature campaign.

“Seattle Compassion” is a voting measure supported by a group of Seattle businesses and community leaders. The measure would remove camps from public spaces by creating more permanent housing and funding mental health and drug addiction treatment services.

The campaign collected 64,155 signatures in order to obtain the proposed amendment to the charter in the November ballot. This is roughly double the required signatures.

RELATED: King County Council Member Pushes to Condemn Seattle Park with Large Homeless Population

If the measure were passed, the city of Seattle would be required to “develop policies and procedures to address people who remain in public spaces,” according to the text of the amendment.

The amendment recognizes that the city is trying to avoid dispersing people living in settlements, except in safe and secure accommodation, “unless staying there poses particular health or safety concerns. public safety or interfere with the use of public spaces by others “.

The groups behind the proposal include the Downtown Seattle Association and several nonprofits working on homeless housing issues.

Editor’s Note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the Chief Seattle Club is a supporter of the Seattle Compassion measure.


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